Diaspora-Artists logo

Showing 4 items related to Thelma Golden



Chris Ofili | Afro Muses 1995 - 2005

Solo show at Studio Museum in Harlem. 1995
Date: 27 April, 1995 until 3 July, 1995
Curator: Thelma Golden
Organiser: The Studio Museum, Harlem

Related items

click to show details of Chris Ofili | Afro Muses 1995 - 2005

»  Chris Ofili | Afro Muses 1995 - 2005

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2005

People in this exhibition

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Exhibition venues

»  Studio Museum in Harlem

New York, United States of America

Thelma Golden

Born, 1966 in Queens, New York

Thelma Golden is the Executive Director and Chief Curator at The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York.

She provided a text - “Albert Chong: Eye & I” for Ancestral Dialogues: The Photographs of Albert Chong [The Friends of Photography [San Francisco, Untitled 57, 1994]. At the time of writing, Golden was Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art and of the Whitney Museum at Philip Morris.

From Golden’s text: “Photographs are traditionally viewed  as the literal embodiment of what is visible; Albert Chong seeks to make manifest what is invisible. His photographs remind me of things I have never really seen, and yet everything is hauntingly familiar. At some level, experiencing his work involves suspending and confronting the knowledge of science - and believing in the potency of magic. It is the precise intermingling of these two forces which converge to capture the moment and bear its essence. Albert Chong’s photographic practice relies on his mastery of science and his surrender to the sources he seeks to render visible.”

From the inIVA website:

‘Since disrupting the status quo with her 1994 exhibition, Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art, Golden has continued to create challenging dialogues around art and artists, making her one of the most respected curators in America. After ten years at the Whitney Museum of American Art, one of the nation’s premier art institutions, Golden took up a new challenge in 2000, joining the Studio Museum in Harlem and becoming executive director and chief curator in 2005’

A quote from a text by Golden, on Chris Ofili,  was used in the gallery guide accompanying Ofili’s mid-career retrospective at Tate Britain, 27 January - 16 May 2010. That particular text was Thelma Golden and Chris Ofili in Conversation, in Chris Ofili, Rizzoli, 2009.

Related items + view all 8

click to show details of Black Romantic - catalogue

»  Black Romantic - catalogue

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2002

click to show details of Chris Ofili - Tate Britain, Gallery guide

»  Chris Ofili - Tate Britain, Gallery guide

Brochure relating to an exhibition, 2010

click to show details of Chris Ofili | Afro Muses 1995 - 2005

»  Chris Ofili | Afro Muses 1995 - 2005

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2005

click to show details of Chris Ofili | Within Reach

»  Chris Ofili | Within Reach

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2003

click to show details of Energy/Experimentation

»  Energy/Experimentation

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2006

Yinka Shonibare (Studio Museum in Harlem)

Solo show at Studio Museum in Harlem. 2002
Date: 24 January, 2002 until 31 March, 2002
Curator: Thelma Golden
Organiser: Studio Museum in Harlem

Solo exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem, of ten works by Yinka Shonibare, made between 1994 and 2001. From the Foreword & Acknowledgments by Lowery Stokes Sims, Director of the Studio Museum:

“From its initial founding, The Studio Museum in Harlem has sought to understand and redefine Africa and the museum has explored the rich traditions in African art. This exhibition allows us to not only make visible our newly expanded mission which includes the presentation of artists of African descent, but also our renewed commitment to the presentation of innovative contemporary art.”

Within her catalogue essay, Thelma Golden, the exhibition’s organiser, wrote  “Born in Nigeria and a resident of London, Yinka Shonibare has brilliantly dismantled the myths of Africanism, even as he has cleverly - and beautifully - exploited its apeal. He has played a crucial role in the debate on multiculturalism and post-colonialism in the United Kingdom. As a student at Goldsmith’s (sic) the leading art school in London, in the 1980s, he devoted himself to work about globalism and other aesthetic and political issues. One day, a professor asked him why he didn’t make “real African art.” Shonibare replied dryly: “I’m African and if I’m making it, it’s African art.”

Shonibare was in fact born in London.

The small but extensively illustrated catalogue included an essay on Shonibare by Okwui Enwezor.

 

Related items

click to show details of Yinka Shonibare (Studio Museum in Harlem)

»  Yinka Shonibare (Studio Museum in Harlem)

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2002

People in this exhibition

»  Yinka Shonibare MBE CBE RA

Born, 1962 in London, England

Exhibition venues

»  Studio Museum in Harlem

New York, United States of America

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Any Number of Preoccupations

Solo show at Studio Museum in Harlem. 2010 - 2011
Date: 11 November, 2010 until 13 March, 2011
Curator: Thelma Golden
Organiser: Studio Museum of Harlem

Major Studio Museum in Harlem exhibition by British artist, Lynette-Yiadom Boakye, called Any Number of Preoccupations, 11 November 2010 – 13 March 2011.

Yiadom-Boakye distinguished herself by producing the most enigmatic of portraits. She tended to take as her subjects Black people, not drawn from life, but instead taken – assembled almost – from a variety of secondary material. The significance of the successes achieved thus far by Yiadom-Boakye cannot easily be overstated. It appeared that Yiadom-Boakye had found ways to present a largely non-racial reading of the Black image. In a world in which the white image stood for the general and the Black image stood for the racially or ethnically or culturally specific, Yiadom-Boakye seemed able to use, or construct the Black image in ways that, whilst not exactly transcending race, or difference, were able to wrestle it free from the limited range of readings that historically seemed to plague the Black image. Yiadom-Boakye seemed able to break what had been, for so many practitioners, a somewhat debilitating coupling of the words Black and artist, even though her portraits reflected an unblinking examination of Black portraiture.

The men and women presented in Yiadom-Boakye’s portraits were oftentimes decidedly dark-skinned and as such, represented an almost over-determination of Blackness. In some portraits, this was achieved by the visibility of the whites of the subjects’ eyes. In others, this sense of over-determination was achieved by the showing of the subjects’ teeth. There was also the use of the decidedly dark backgrounds or overall environments in which the artist located her subjects. For a Black artist to be able to paint Black people and to draw positive attention from the art world was rare indeed.

This was an important exhibition by the artist, coming as it did with a substantial colour catalogue. From one of the catalogue’s essays, by Naomi Beckwith:

“Central to the exhibition Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Any number of Preoccupations is the recent painting entitled Any Number of Preoccupations. In addition to lending the exhibition its title, this exceptional canvas by Yiadom-Boakye demonstrates the artist’s considerable skills in figuration and color and is indicative of the most prominent feature of her painting practice: her body of work consists entirely of human figures, the majority of which are black.” Beckwith’s essay concludes, “Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings are not neat in the same way that historical narratives are muddled, untidy and representationally suspect.”

Related items

click to show details of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Any Number of Preoccupations

»  Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Any Number of Preoccupations

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2010

People in this exhibition

»  Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Born, 1977 in London

Exhibition venues

»  Studio Museum in Harlem

New York, United States of America