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Showing 5 items related to Dazed & Confused



Afro Daze - Chris Ofili

Article relating to an individual, 1998
Published by: Dazed & Confused
Year published: 1998
Number of pages: 6

image of Afro Daze - Chris Ofili

One of several features on Chris Ofili, that appeared in Dazed & Confused magazine. The issue was No. 48, November 1998, pp. 74 - 80. The feature was written by Rachel Newsome and included a photograph of Ofili by artist Wolfgang Tillmans. The text was lavishly illustrated with a number of reproductions of Ofili’s paintings of this period, which famously featured, as something of a trademark, balls of elephany dung, either as props on which the paintings rested, or as adornment within the paintings themselves. The issue in which Afro Daze appeared came out just at the time that Ofili’s important solo exhibition at the Serpentine, was closing. The exhibition was mentioned in the opening sentence of the text.

The feature was introduced as follows: Turned on by Tina Turner, Lil’ Kim, Diana Ross, Foxy Brown, Biggie Smalls, Tupac, Snoop Doggy, Puff Daddy, Muhammed (sic) Ali. Hooked on beauty, African-influenced dots, semi-logical patterns, bright tangerine, moss green, pale lemon, deep purple, porno red, porn, streetlife, the illicit, a glimpse of glamour… and elephant dung. Educated on modernism, David Hammons, Jean-Michel Basquiat, William Blake and The Bible. A second generation, black British Mancunian living in London. Urban imagist, meta imagist, cultural conceptualist, creative structuralist, there is something of the apocalyptic in the visual predicate calculus of Chris Ofili: it’s a late ‘90s thing.

Following an introduction, the text takes the form of an exchange between CO and D&C. From the exchange: D&C: Yes, surely all culture comes from the grass roots. It’s got to.

CO: I think people underestimate the ghetto. I think it’s almost one step ahead. By the time it’s reached the so-called mainstream, the grassroots are onto something completely different.

Related people

»  Jean-Michel Basquiat

Born, 1960 in Brooklyn. Died, 1988

»  David Hammons

Born, 1943 in USA

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

»  Wolfgang Tillmans

Born, 1968 in Remscheid, Germany

In the Public Domain: Chris Ofili Meets Mary J Blige

Article relating to an individual, 1999
Published by: Dazed & Confused
Year published: 1999
Number of pages: 6

image of In the Public Domain: Chris Ofili Meets Mary J Blige

One of several features involving Chris Ofili, that appeared in Dazed & Confused magazine. The issue was No. 58, September 1999, pp. 80 - 86. The feature was in fact a dialogue between Ofili and Mary J Blige, the American singer-songwriter, record producer and actress. The text was lavishly illustrated with a number of portraits of Blige, taken by Nick Haymes.

The feature was introduced as follows: She helped turn a marginalised macho genre into a worldwide phenomenon and she still turns heads. He turns the ephemera of black culture into a bigger picture. Meet the icon and the iconographer and say “hello”, Mary J Blige and Chris Ofili.

From the text: “Chris Ofili: It’s a very curious thing for me that you sing about heartfelt things in public.

Mary J Blige: The things I don’t want to tell you, you don’t know. But the things that I want to speak upon are things that have happened to me and probably other people. I’m not ashamed to say I didn’t finish high school. I’m not ashamed to say I’ve been in abusive relatinships. Things like this happen every single day and in order to heal myself I have to speak on it and without even knowing it I’m healing others. They come to me and say ‘You saved my life’ and I’m like ‘Whoa, you know I was trying to save my life.’ “

Related people

»  Mary J Blige

Born, 1971 in Bronx, New York

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Chris Ofili - Dazed & Confused June 1996

Article relating to an individual, 1996
Published by: Dazed & Confused
Year published: 1996
Number of pages: 2

image of Chris Ofili - Dazed & Confused June 1996

Early feature on Chris Ofili, that appeared in Dazed & Confused, Issue 21, June 1996, pp. 26-27. The feature was written by Martin Herbert and consisted of an exchange between Dazed & Confused and Chris Ofil, introduced as “Ofili’s lush abstractions and quasi-figurations incorporate the stools of the noble African elephant as both cultural signifier and decorative aspect, a feature which has tended to obscure attention to the more delicate undercurrents of art. The issue of personal identity, the pursuit of beauty, and, in Ofili’s latest show of paintings at Victoria Miro gallery, the pervasive influence of music, especially jazz.”

As with pretty much all features on Ofili, over a period of a number of years from the mid 1990s onwards, it was Ofili’s asscociations with elephant dung which were most used as props within these features. This article was no exception. ‘The rumour is that when painters get together they talk about brands of turpentine and brushes. Conversations with Chris Ofili tend to resolve around another subject; elephant shit.’

The exchange began as follows:

Dazed & Confused: Jazz has fed into the content of your art…
Chris Ofili: A lot of what I’m doing now has more of a hip hop flavour. But jazz has this feeling of strong structre, mixed with the opposite, improvisation.

The accompanying full-page portrait of Ofili was taken by Dean Chalkey.

Related people

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Shame on you

Article relating to a film, 2012
Published by: Dazed & Confused
Year published: 2012
Number of pages: 4

image of Shame on you

A substantial feature on film director Steve McQueen, the actor Michael Fassbender, and the then new McQueen film, Shame. The feature was one of many that took as its subject McQueen/Fassbender/Shame. It featured full page portraits of McQueen and Fassbender, by photographer Ronald Dick, with two pages of text by Kin Woo. A smaller portrait of McQueen and Fassbender also appeared in the text.

The piece was introduced as follows: “Michal Fassbender starved himself to play dying hunger striker Bobby Sands in Steve McQueen’s debut feature, Hunger. Now they’ve tackled another controversial topic: sex addiction.

In Shame. the visceral second feature from artist-turned-filmmaker Steve McQueen, Michael Fassbender stars as Brandon, a man who just can’t get enough. With his slick, handsome looks, he beds countless women (and one man) everywhere: in his sterile apartment, up against a glass wall at New York’s Standard Hotel, and even out in the city streets. And if he seems to be barely functioning at his yuppie job, his carefully ordered existence slowly starts to unravel with the arrival of his emotionally unstable, damaged and suicidal younger sister, Sissy, a torch singer played by the mesmerising Carey Milligan.”

Woo concludes his introduction, “With the pair in celebratory mood after Fassbender won the Best Actror award at the Venice Film Festival, Dazed brought them together to talk about the effect of the film on their lives.”

There then follows the greater part of two pages of a transcribed conversation between McQueen and Fassbender.

The feature, “Shame on you”, appeared in Dazed & Confused, Vol III/06, February 2012: 82 - 85

This was not the first time the magazine had taken a pronounced interest in McQueen and his work. It had previously ran a feature titled “Steve McQueen | Louder than Bombs”. Likewise, Dazed & Confused had run several features on the painter Chris Ofili.


 

Related people

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK

Steve McQueen | Louder Than Bombs

Magazine relating to a film, 2008
Published by: Dazed & Confused
Year published: 2008
Number of pages: 4

image of Steve McQueen | Louder Than Bombs

Four page feature on Steve McQueen and his directing debut, Hunger. The piece was titled Louder Than Bombs and appeared in Dazed & Confused magazine, Vol. 2 Issue #67, November 2008, pages 154 - 157. Illustrated with three large colour photographs. The first, a dramatic portrait of Steve McQueen by Immo Klink. The second, a still from the film, the third, a photograph of the director at work, on set, with Hunger’s star, Michael Fassbender as the IRA hunger striker, Bobby Sands. The magazine’s cover flags up the feature as ‘Steve McQueen ON THE YEAR”S MOST FEARLESS FILM’. The feature itself opens with  TURNER PRIZE VIDEO ARTIST STEVE McQUEEN HAS MADE HIS FIRST FEATURE, A HARROWING PORTRAIT OF THE 1981 HUNGER STRIKE. HE TALKS TO OCTAVIA MORRIS ABOUT MAKING ONE OF THE YEAR’S MOST UNCOMPROMISING FILMS. PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPH BY IMMO KLINK.

One of McQueen’s quotes is flagged in capitals within the feature: “PEOPLE WITHOUT BALLS NEVER CROSS THE LINE. BUT THAT’S WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT”.

 

Related people

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK