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Showing 4 items related to Modern Painters



Black Art: The Labour Party’s Line

Article relating to an exhibition, 1989
Published by: Modern Painters
Year published: 1989
Unpaginated.

image of Black Art: The Labour Party’s Line

2 sheet A4 portrait (cut down to size)/monochrome text with illustrations, photocopy from original/article taken from Modern Painters, winter 1989-1990, p.77-78

Title: Black Art: The Labour Party’s Line
Author: Mark Fisher MP

Article written response to the exhibition, The Other Story, in relation to what were current Arts Council policies for “cultural diversity“, regional funding and council obligations and what the Labour party (at this time in opposition to the ruling Conservative government) would deliver should they be in power. From the text: “”If employment is crucial in arts administration, it is particularly so at a local level where projects grow out of the needs and traditions of communities. This is where the real progress in cultural diversity is going to be made in the next ten years, rather than in high profile projects handed down from the Arts Council or from the ministry of Arts and Media that a Labour Government would establish.”

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Chris Ofili - Dung & Glitter

Article relating to an individual, 1998
Published by: Modern Painters
Year published: 1998
Number of pages: 2

image of Chris Ofili - Dung & Glitter

Modern Painters, 11.3 (Autumn 1998): 41-42.

Dung & Glitter was one of many features on Chris Ofili, that began to emerge around the time of the artist being shortlisted for the Turner Prize of 1998. One of the most distinctive aspects of this press features was the astonishing range of journals and publications that acknowledged Ofili. In this regard, Modern Painters (in which Dung & Glitter appeared) was no exception. An attendant notable characteristic of this coverage was that the writers and magazines in question had previously taken little or no  interest in the work of other Black artists. Dung & Glitter reflected the extent to which Ofili was breaking new ground. The feature followed directly after a one page summary, The Turner Prize Shortlist which briskly introduced Ofili and the other shortlisted artits, Tacita Dean, Cathy de Monchaux and Sam Taylor-Wood.

Dung & Glitter stressed the technical aspects of Ofili’s practice, as well as touching on what the writer, Martin Maloney, saw as the significance of the content of Ofili’s paintings. The troubling use of pronouns such as ‘we’ or ‘you’ was a consistent characteristic of press coverage relating to artists such as McQueen and Chris Ofili, and revealed no end of troubling assumptions about art, galleries, audiences, and readerships. Typical in this regard was the final sentence of this feature on Chris Ofili, which ended with Be warned; the ‘black experience’ you crave might not be as authentic as you think!”

Like others, such as Adrian Searle, Maloney suggested that Ofili “could well win the Turner Prize.”

Dung & Glitter opened with “Chris Ofili in five years has moved from  densely layered abstract paintings to figurative paintings. His new work uses a graphic image made from a simple abstract shape and painted as a densely beaded surface like a mosaic, to describe, say, hair, a leg or a breast. And he has found an increasing use for collaged pictures from magazines. Although both periods of his paintings look labour intensive, his earlier works evidence a chaotic procedure which made for a rich and rewarding surface, full of surprising incidents.”

Spread over two pages, Dung & Gitter was illustrated with several reproductions of the artist’s work, plus a portrait of Ofili, and a detail of one of his paintings.

 

 

 

 

Related people

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

The Turner Prize Shortlist - Modern Painters

Article relating to an exhibition, 1998
Published by: Modern Painters
Year published: 1998
Number of pages: 1

image of The Turner Prize Shortlist - Modern Painters

“So that Modern Painters readers may place their bets, here is a preview of the contenders, whose works will be on show at the Tate Gallery in London from 2 October to 10 January 1999. The £20,000 winner will be announced on 1 December. We invite readers to make their own selection and we’ll let you know who the ‘Modern Painters winner’ would have been from this poll. Artist’s name on a postcard, please, to the address at the front of the magazine. If you accompany your choice with a letter explaining your preference, or other comments  on the Turner Prize, we are offering a bottle of champagne (sorry, not twenty grand) for the best letter, which will be published in our next issue.”

There then followed brief, but succinct illustrated introductions to the work of the four artists shortlised for the Turner Prize in 1998. The piece appeared in Modern Painters, Autumn 1998, page 40. The artists in question were Tacita Dean, Cathy de Monchaux, Chis Ofili and Sam Taylor-Wood. The following article in the magazine was a piece on Ofili by Martin Maloney.

 

Related people

»  Tacita Dean

Born, 1965 in Canterbury, UK

»  Cathy de Monchaux

Born, 1960 in London, UK

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

»  Sam Taylor-Wood

Born, 1967 in London, England

Related exhibitions

»  Turner Prize 1998

Group show at Tate Britain. 1998 - 1999

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Tracey Moffatt - Modern Painters review

Review relating to an exhibition, 1998
Published by: Modern Painters
Year published: 1998
Number of pages: 1

image of Tracey Moffatt - Modern Painters review

Written by Peter Bradbury, this was a review of Australian artist Tracey Moffatt’s solo exhibition at Arnolfini, Bristol, in 1998. The review appeared in Modern Painters Autumn 1998, page 118. The substantial review took up a full page, with a still from Moffatt’s Night Cries illustrating the review.

“The Australian artist Tracey Moffatt’s first major show in Britain is powerful and distiurbing. Made up of six components - four series of still photographs and two short films - its themes is the emotional, social and cultural border country in which people and traditions come together and divide.”

 

Related people

»  Tracey Moffatt

Born, 1960 in Australia

Related exhibitions

»  Tracey Moffatt

Solo show at Arnolfini. 1998

Related venues

»  Arnolfini

Bristol, United Kingdom