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Preview: From Another World

Article relating to an exhibition, 1989
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1989
Unpaginated.

image of Preview: From Another World

Single sheet A4 portrait (slightly cut down)/monochrome photocopy from original/from the preview section from Art Monthly (no issue, date) p.32

Title: From Another World
Author: Adeola Solanke

Preview contains a small reproduction with the following caption: “F.N Souza, Girl with Goat, 1949“. Author looks at the publicity for the exhibition The Other Story and questions the placing of the selected artists within the sphere of post war modernism. From the text: “Araeen’s account of Afro-Asian artists in this country starts in the post-war period and concentrates in the on the last four decades. “It is’, he tells us in the catalogue, “a story of those men and women who defied their “otherness” and entered the modern space that was forbidden to them.’”

Related people + view all 25

»  Frank Bowling OBE, RA

Born, 1935 - 1937 (probably 1936) in British Guiana (now Guyana) Caribbean/S. America

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Lubaina Himid MBE

Born, 1954 in Zanzibar, Tanzania

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Exhibitions/TSWA Four Cities Project - Art Monthly review/2

Review relating to an exhibition, 1990
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1990
Number of pages: 2

image of Exhibitions/TSWA Four Cities Project - Art Monthly review/2

Second of two photocopied sheets of A4, of a review in Art Monthly, October 1990, pages 14 and 15. (The original magazine is in the TSWA file). The review, titled TSWA Four Cities Project, was written by John Furse and related to TSWA Four Cities Project. John Furse was responsible for  a review of TSWA Four Cities Project that appeared in Art Monthly, October 1990. The review ran across two pages of Art Monthly 140, October 1990. Donald Rodney was one of a number of artists who made work for the TSWA Four Cities Project. An investigation of circulatory systems, from one entity to another, and back again, lay at the heart of Rodney’s commission for TSWA Plymouth 1990, Visceral Canker. In its original context, Visceral Canker was installed in the nocturnal bowels of Drake’s Island Battery, off the coast of Plymouth, a maritime city in the south west of England, with a pronounced association with seafaring, trade, exploration and so on. Also known as Garden Battery, Mount Edgecumbe, or the Palmerston gun-battery (after the 19th century British Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, under whose watch the battery was commissioned), this was one of a series of fortifications built around Plymouth Sound during the 1860s as part of a programme of defensive enhancements to Britain’s naval bases. Drake’s Island Battery had a long history - right up until WWII - as a fortified site, for the purposes of defending the realm and the strategically important city of Plymouth . As an installation, Visceral Canker was perhaps a persuasive and telling undertaking, responding as it did to the formal and associated aspects of the space and environment in which it was located. Drake’s Island Battery was in some ways a stark metaphor for Rodney and his own ailing body. As a fortified site of defence, Drake’s Island Battery was perhaps not the most effective bastion. Likewise Rodney’s body, though skin, flesh and bone like other bodies, was increasingly unable to defend itself against the debilitating effects of diseases of the blood such as sickle-cell anaemia.

References to Rodney’s installation  appeared in Art Monthly, October 1990. Written by John Furse, the review provided a useful introduction to Visceral Canker. In part, it read, “…the Palmerston gun-battery, part of a complex fortress system built to defend the City of Plymouth against foreign intruders… Rodney’s two-part piece is a terse comment on the parts played by Elizabeth I and her naval commander Sir John Hawkins, a Devon man, in the development of the slave-trade. Coats of arms (there is an image of a hanged Moor in Hawkins’) are linked by transparent tubing to a simple pumping system that acts as a metaphor for the human heart and in turn, as Rodney sees it, the hearts of the nation.”

Related people + view all 28

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

»  Jana Sterbak

Born, 1955 in Prague

»  Rosemarie Trockel

Born, 1952 in Schwerte

»  Darrell Viner

Born, 1946 in Coventry, England

»  Richard Wilson

Born, 1953 in London, England

Related exhibitions

»  TSWA Four Cities Project

Group show 1988 - 1989

Shades of Black book review (Art Monthly)

Review relating to a publication, 2005
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2005
Number of pages: 2

image of Shades of Black book review (Art Monthly)

Two sheets of A4 portrait/monochrome photocopy from original/Original copy also in archive/ Review taken from Art Monthly, Issue 288, July - August 2005/page 46 - 47/Book review

Title: Shades of Black
Author: Eddie Chambers

Article is a review of the publication Shades of Black. Publication details: Shades of Black, Assembling Black Arts in 1980s Britain, eds David A Bailey, Ian Baucom and Sonia Boyce, Duke University Press/inIVA/Aavaa, London, 2005, 340pp, colour and b/w illus, pb, 19.95/ISBN 0 8223 3420 8

Extract from the review as follows: “The publication opens with Stuart Hall’s contribution. “Assembling the 1980’s: the Deluge - and After“, in which he tries “to frame a provisional answer to the question: How might we begin to ‘assemble’ the 1980s as an object of critical knowledge?” In a wide ranging and highly engaging paper, Hall offers two things for our critical consideration. Firstly a highly nuanced deconstruction and reconstruction of the artistic and cultural events that give the decade much of its apparent significance. “By and large, even though a number of the contributors have undoubtedly done very well for themselves out of the 80s, the decade is remembered here with little fondness or affection and almost alarmingly, perhaps, with little passion or enthusiasm, not even for some of the incredible visual art produced during the 80s. Such a charmless and sullen recollection is perhaps of little real surprise, given the preponderance of bad news during that decade. As [Keith] Piper suggests, part of the dominant text of the 1990s was an expression of happy release from the dreary preoccupations of the 1980s.”

Related people + view all 54

»  Allan deSouza

Born, 1958 in Nairobi, Kenya

»  Kobena Mercer

Born, 1960 in Ghana

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

»  Shen Yuan

Sutapa Biswas | Synapse review, Art Monthly

Review relating to an exhibition, 1992
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1992
Unpaginated.

image of Sutapa Biswas | Synapse review, Art Monthly

2 sheets of A4 photocopied from original/cover and review from Art Monthly/December - January 1992/issue 162/page 27

Title: Sutapa Biswas: Synapse
Written by Ian Connolly Hunt
Contains a photographic reproduction, credited as: Sutapa Biswas, Synapse, 1992

From the text: “Two of the three distinct groupings of work that make up this brave and intricately conceived exhibition demanded the brief biographical statement that was available in the gallery: that Sutapa Biswas was born in Santinekethan, India in 1962, left when she was four and did not return there until 1987.”

Related people

»  Sutapa Biswas

Born, 1962 in Bolpur, India

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Leeds City Art Gallery, The Headrow

Leeds, United Kingdom

»  Or Gallery

Vancouver, Canada, Canada

»  The Photographers’ Gallery

London, United Kingdom

In the heart of the black box

Article relating to an exhibition, 2002
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2002
Unpaginated.

image of In the heart of the black box

A4 laserjet copy/taken from “Athens” research website/originally published in Art Monthly, no. 259 (September 2002) p.17/Letter to the editor - in relation to Documenta 11/2 pages

Title: In the heart of the black box
Author: Rasheed Araeen

In a letter to the editor, the writer criticizes the content of The Black Box, curator Okwui Enwezor’s introductory essay in the catalogue for the Documenta 11 exhibition. From the article: “Enwezor claims to be contesting the language of Modernism and the Avant Garde, which he thinks represents a continuation of Western hegemony. What then is the actual language of the artworks he is presenting as an alternative which, in his view, goes “beyond Westernism” and “shatters the narrow focus of Western global optics”? can mere subject matter - here he invokes the struggle of the oppressed - confront and change the language in which it is inserted adequately and still produce something significantly new and different in terms of art? If the language remains the same as that in what is denounced as part of “the scheme of Empire”, how is Enwezor carrying out his ambition of “displacing its historical context” in Kassel? “

Related people + view all 121

»  Isaac Julien

Born, 1960 in London, England

»  Glenn Ligon

Born, 1960 in New York

»  Adrian Piper

Born, 1948

»  Nari Ward

Born, 1963 in St.Andrews, Jamaica

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Documenta Halle

Kassel, Germany

Art Monthly 288 | Carrie Mae Weems

Article relating to an exhibition, 2005
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2005
Number of pages: 2

image of Art Monthly 288 | Carrie Mae Weems

Review of Carrie Mae Weems exhibition at Cafe Gallery Projects, London, June 8 - July 3 2005, written by Eddie Chambers. Extract as follows: “Within her practice Weems often makes generous yet considered use of text. To this end, her work has developed a particularly recognisable aesthetic. While Weems’ work is well known within the US, this exhibition is the first opportunity that London audiences have of seeing an exhibition of her work. Strangely perhaps, those responsible for the exhibition have selected as the main body of the exhibition a work dating back to 1995. From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried consists of 32 photographic panels, each one an individual or group portrait of an African-American person or persons. The images range from those taken in the early decades of photography through to more recent times, though none of the images could be said to date from the present day.”

Art Monthly 288 (July - August 2005) pp. 30 - 31

Related people

»  Carrie Mae Weems

Born, 1953 in Portland, Oregon

Related exhibitions

»  Carrie Mae Weems

Solo show at Cafe Gallery Projects. 2005

Related venues

»  Cafe Gallery Projects

London, United Kingdom

Art Monthly 288 | Steve McQueen

Article relating to an exhibition, 2005
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2005
Unpaginated.

image of Art Monthly 288 | Steve McQueen

2 sheets A4 portrait/monochrome type with illustrations, original article still in magazine/review from Art Monthly, issue 288, July - August 2005, p.37-38

Title: Steve McQueen - Prada Foundation/Milan, April 12 to June 12
Author: Lucy Steeds

Article contains a photographic reproduction with the following caption: “Steve McQueen, Girls, Tricky, 2001- video still. From the article: “Pursuit offers respite from the nightmarish detail of the mine of Western Deep and a salve for the mental scars from mass suicide in Caribs’ Leap. After Charlotte and Girls, Tricky it offers space to reflect upon the absence of people, more than their presence.”

Related people

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Prada Foundation

Milan, Italy

Art Monthly 288 | Africa Remix (letter)

Letter relating to an exhibition, 2005
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2005
Unpaginated.

image of Art Monthly 288 | Africa Remix (letter)

Letter in Art Monthly 288 (July - August 2005), p. 17, titled “Black to Black and White“. The letter, written by Pablo Lafuente took issue with a letter that had been published in the previous issue of Art Montly. Lafuente’s letter opened as follows: “In a letter published last month (AM 287), Alana Jelinek questioned the editor’s choice of Sally O’Reilly as a reviewer of Africa Remix at Hayward Gallery, as well as her approach to the exhbition, and her supposed inability to deal with the cultural and geographical issues raised by the selection of artists, as if, in Jelinek’s words, she was ‘overwhelmed by the foreign-ness of the project’.”

The letter also references a review of Africa Remix (quoted by O’Reilly) written by Jonathan Jones for the Guardian newspaper.

Related people

»  Pablo Lafuente

Born, 1976 in Spain

Related venues

»  Prada Foundation

Milan, Italy

Sutapa Biswas | Synapse - Art Monthly review

Article relating to an exhibition, 1992
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1992
Unpaginated.

image of Sutapa Biswas | Synapse - Art Monthly review

A4 single sheet/monochrome photocopy from original/Article from Art Monthly, issue 162, page 27 (no date)/review in relation to an exhibition by Sutapa Biswas

Title: Sutapa Biswas: Synapse
Author: Ian Connolly Hunt

Image accompanying article : Sutapa Biswas, Synapse, 1992. Review of the solo exhibition by Sutapa Biswas titled Synapse at the Photographers’ Gallery, London: 16 October - 14 November.
From the review: “If this sequence circumvented the direct confrontation with memory shown in the Synapse series itself, for which photographs from India were projected onto Biswas’ naked body, its unease led arguably, to empowerment for both artist and spectator. It fell short of healing the division between body and mind, amongst other western polarities, a somewhat extravagant claim made for the work in the accompanying essays by Gilane Tawadros and Griselda Pollock. These are by no means careless writers, they are tough in the Edward Said and Screen traditions; but neither quite broaches the question of whether the political satisfaction of working with the injuries done to subjectivity by race and migration (by bravely dramatising the encounter with memory and a past that, perhaps more than most, has to be constructed rather than easily assumed) might, in some sense, be merely a consolation prize.”

Related people

»  Sutapa Biswas

Born, 1962 in Bolpur, India

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Leeds City Art Gallery, The Headrow

Leeds, United Kingdom

»  Or Gallery

Vancouver, Canada, Canada

»  The Photographers’ Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Art Monthly 288 | Back to Black: art, cinema and the racial imaginary

Review relating to an exhibition, 2005
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 2005
Number of pages: 2

image of Art Monthly 288 | Back to Black: art, cinema and the racial imaginary

2 sheets A4 portrait/monochrome reproduction from original/Review taken from Art Monthly issue 288, July - August 2005/page 28 -29

Title: Back to Black: art, cinema and the racial imaginary, 7 June - 4 September 2005
Author: Marcus Verhagan

Review of the group exhibition that took place at Whitechapel Gallery, London. Review contains photographic reproduction: Gordon Parks, Eldridge and Kathleen Cleaver with a portrait of Huey Newton 1970. From the article: “It is a busy, garrulous, polyphonic show - and one that covers different places and media. The curators, Richard J Powell, David A Bailey and Petrine Archer-Shaw, concentrate on developments in the US, Jamaica and Britain, showing film clips, fashion designs and album covers alongside paintings, prints and sculptures. And like Rhapsodies in Black, the 1997 Hayward show on the Harlem Renaissance, which was also curated by Powell and Bailey, Back to Black is accompanied by a fine, ambitious catalogue.”

Related people + view all 49

»  Richard J. Powell

Born, 1953 in Chicago, USA.

»  Melvin Van Peebles

Born, 1932

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  The New Art Gallery Walsall

Walsall, United Kingdom

»  Whitechapel Art Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Exhibitions: The Other Story

Review relating to an exhibition, 1990
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1990
Number of pages: 2

image of Exhibitions: The Other Story

2 sheets A4 portrait/monochrome text and images, original document still in magazine/Review taken from Art Monthly, February 1990, issue 133, p. 14 & 16 - Exhibitions section

Title: The Other Story
Author: Petrine Archer-Shaw

Review contains a small photographic reproduction with the following caption: ‘Ron Moody, John The Baptist, 1936

Review that accepts the thematic and construction of the exhibition, The Other Story, yet critiques its disconnectedness from what were recent cultural developments and questions its relationship with Modernism, and suggests that the curator is supplanting the “myths” surrounding Modernism with ones of his own making. An extract from the text: “Hence there exist discreet parallels between the ‘otherness’ of the Western avant-garde lineage and ‘The Other Story“ as presented by Araeen. Despite his intention to maintain a purely historical approach, his indulgence in myth making seems implicit within his choice of presenting “a Story“. This also begs the question of the extent to which one can challenge modernism’s exclusivity while using the same tools which have engendered it.…”

Related people

»  Petrine Archer-Straw (Dr.)

Born, 1956 in Birmingham UK. Died, 2012

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Donald Rodney obituary

Obituary relating to an individual, 1998
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1998
Unpaginated.

image of Donald Rodney obituary

Art Monthly obituary for Donald Rodney, April 1998, (Art Monthly 215), written by Eddie Chambers. Extracts as follows: “Donald Rodney was, as I have twice previously recorded in Art Monthly, “one of the most interesting artists of his generation“. The statement needs repeating - and remembering - because Donald Rodney produced his art by refusing to let sickle-cell anaemia - the frequently debilitating disease of the blood, from which he suffered - get the better of him.”

Related people

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Chris Ofili: Afrodizzia

Review relating to an exhibition, 1996
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1996
Unpaginated.

image of Chris Ofili: Afrodizzia

2 sheets A4 portrait/monochrome reproduction from original/review in relation to an exhibition

Title: Chris Ofili, Victoria Miro Gallery, London May 25 - June 21
Author: Godfrey Worsdale
Source: Art Monthly, issue 198, July - August 1996, pp. 27-28

Review of a solo show of Chris Ofili - interesting in that this exhibition in a sense marked a development of certain ideas in the artist’s practice that would lead to him winning the Turner Prize two years later. This exhibition was also the first time the painting The Holy Virgin Mary had been shown - this painting would later cause controversy in New York where the then mayor, Rudi Giuliani would attempt to ban the exhibition, Sensation, that the painting was included in.

From the review: ”Over recent years he has succeeded in assimilating specific African aesthetic attitudes and technical means into his painting whilst making work which thoroughly satisfies the criterion of the European easel painting tradition, both in terms of pure aesthetic sensibility and that very particular sense of European decorum (as opposed to African majesty). What made this recent body of work most admirable was that the artist had, to a considerable extent, dispensed with this successful formula, and had changed the tone of the work into something altogether more funky. The dot painting style, learned from a visit to an ancient cave site in Zimbabwe, had been co-opted into the service of a much looser canon than that of traditional European art history. Instead the style and attitude of black American culture of the 70’s, which pervades and influences so much of this decades’s popular culture, had become distinctly perceptible and significant.”

 

Related people

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Related exhibitions

»  Afrodizzia

Solo show at Victoria Miro Gallery. 1996

Related venues

»  Victoria Miro Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Three Songs on Pain Light & Time (review of a film about Donald Rodney)

Review relating to an exhibition, 1996
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1996
Unpaginated.

image of Three Songs on Pain Light & Time (review of a film about Donald Rodney)

Single sheet A4 portrait/monochrome reproduction from original/Art Monthly, October 1996 No. 200. Pages 65-66.

Review of Three Songs on Pain Light & Time, a film on Donald Rodney made by Edward George & Trevor Mathison of the Black Audio Film Collective. Written by Eddie Chambers.

Related people

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Edward George

Born, 1963 in London, England

»  Trevor Mathison

Born, 1960

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related exhibitions

Aubrey Williams - obituary, Art Monthly

Obituary relating to an individual, 1990
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1990
Number of pages: 1

image of Aubrey Williams - obituary, Art Monthly

Obituary of Aubrey Williams, that appeared in Art Montly Number 137, June 1990, p. 35. Original clipping. The obituary was written by Denis Bowen, and Williams had died in April 1990. The text was accompanied by a portrait of Williams, though the photograph was uncredited. From the obituary, “The name of Aubrey Williams would come to mind in any reflection on the avant-garde scene of the Fifties and Sixties in London. Like many artists from the Caribbean and from other parts of the Commonwelath he was drawn to London in the post-war surge to redefine values not only in art but also in all walks of life. It was the beginning of an internatiobnal fusion of the Arts.”

The obituary concluded, “Aubrey Williams had an enquiring mind continually focussed on the relationship between man and nature and inspired by mythological mysteries, the images and artefacts of these ancient Amerindian cultures which lay at the source of his visual development. He was an artist whose work bridges race, cultures and religious and whose body of work stands as testimony to his achievement which assured him a place in the British art scene.”

Within the obituary, several names were spelled incorrectly. Wilson Harris appeared as William Harris and Imruh Caesar appeared as Imra Caesar.

Related people

»  Denis Bowen

Born, 1921 in Kimberley, South Africa. Died, 2006

»  Aubrey Williams

Born, 1926 in Georgetown, Guyana. Died, 1990

Exhibitions/TSWA Four Cities Project - Art Monthly review/1

Review relating to an exhibition, 1990
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1990
Number of pages: 2

image of Exhibitions/TSWA Four Cities Project - Art Monthly review/1

First of two photocopied sheets of A4, of a review in Art Monthly, October 1990, pages 14 and 15. (THe original magazine is in the TSWA file). The review, titled TSWA Four Cities Project, was written by John Furse and related to TSWA Four Cities Project. John Furse was responsible for  a review of TSWA Four Cities Project that appeared in Art Monthly, October 1990. The review ran across two pages of Art Monthly 140, October 1990. Donald Rodney was one of a number of artists who made work for the TSWA Four Cities Project. An investigation of circulatory systems, from one entity to another, and back again, lay at the heart of Rodney’s commission for TSWA Plymouth 1990, Visceral Canker. In its original context, Visceral Canker was installed in the nocturnal bowels of Drake’s Island Battery, off the coast of Plymouth, a maritime city in the south west of England, with a pronounced association with seafaring, trade, exploration and so on. Also known as Garden Battery, Mount Edgecumbe, or the Palmerston gun-battery (after the 19th century British Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, under whose watch the battery was commissioned), this was one of a series of fortifications built around Plymouth Sound during the 1860s as part of a programme of defensive enhancements to Britain’s naval bases. Drake’s Island Battery had a long history - right up until WWII - as a fortified site, for the purposes of defending the realm and the strategically important city of Plymouth . As an installation, Visceral Canker was perhaps a persuasive and telling undertaking, responding as it did to the formal and associated aspects of the space and environment in which it was located. Drake’s Island Battery was in some ways a stark metaphor for Rodney and his own ailing body. As a fortified site of defence, Drake’s Island Battery was perhaps not the most effective bastion. Likewise Rodney’s body, though skin, flesh and bone like other bodies, was increasingly unable to defend itself against the debilitating effects of diseases of the blood such as sickle-cell anaemia.

References to Rodney’s installation  appeared in Art Monthly, October 1990. Written by John Furse, the review provided a useful introduction to Visceral Canker. In part, it read, “…the Palmerston gun-battery, part of a complex fortress system built to defend the City of Plymouth against foreign intruders… Rodney’s two-part piece is a terse comment on the parts played by Elizabeth I and her naval commander Sir John Hawkins, a Devon man, in the development of the slave-trade. Coats of arms (there is an image of a hanged Moor in Hawkins’) are linked by transparent tubing to a simple pumping system that acts as a metaphor for the human heart and in turn, as Rodney sees it, the hearts of the nation.”

Related people + view all 28

»  Stefan Gec

Born, 1958 in Huddersfield, England

»  Ian Hamilton Finlay

Born, 1925 in Nassau, Bahamas

»  Ron Haselden

Born, 1944 in Gravesend, Kent, England

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

»  Richard Wilson

Born, 1953 in London, England

Related exhibitions

»  TSWA Four Cities Project

Group show 1988 - 1989

Cold Comfort - Piers Mastersonreview

Review relating to an exhibition, 1996
Published by: Art Monthly
Year published: 1996
Number of pages: 2

image of Cold Comfort - Piers Mastersonreview

Single sheet A4 portrait/monochcrome reproduction from original
Title: Cold Comfort: Permindar Kaur. Review by Piers Masterson, Art Monthly, 1998 July-August 1996.

Related people

»  Permindar Kaur

Born, 1965 in Nottingham, England

Related exhibitions

»  Cold Comfort

Solo show at The Bluecoat Gallery. 1996

»  Cold Comfort Part I

Solo show at Ikon Gallery. 1996

Related venues

»  The Bluecoat Gallery

Liverpool, United Kingdom

»  Ikon Gallery

Birmingham, United Kingdom

»  Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre

Coventry, United Kingdom