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Showing 5 items related to Art in America



Art in America | Steve McQueen

Article relating to a film, 2009
Published by: Art in America
Year published: 2009
Unpaginated.

image of Art in America | Steve McQueen

Feature in Art in America of March 2009, on Steve McQueen’s feature film Hunger.
On one of the magazine’s contents pages, the feature is referenced as follows: “Body and Soul by Barbara Pollack. Steve McQueen’s eloquently harrowing first feature, about IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands, explores the political and spiritual costs of violence to onself and others.“ The two-page piece (pages 75/76/78) features a number of film stills from Hunger and other works by McQueen and a photograph of McQueen directing Michael Fassbender as Bobby Sands in Hunger: “Like McQueen’s earlier works, Hunger highlights the materiality of filmmaking to ratchet up the physicality of the experience on view.…”

Related people

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK

Chris Ofili | Ofili’s Glittering Icons

Article relating to an individual, 2000
Published by: Art in America
Year published: 2000
Number of pages: 6

image of Chris Ofili | Ofili’s Glittering Icons

Lynn MacRitchie was responsible for a major magazine feature on Chris Ofili, published in the January 2000 issue of Art in America. Lynn MacRitchie, Ofili’s Glittering Icons: The intensely decorative paintings of Chris Ofili are informed by the vibrancy of black popular culture and the reality of British racism, aspects often overlooked in the controversy surrounding his work in “Sensation.” Art in America, pages 96 - 101. The text was extensively illustrated, including three full-page reproductions, one of which was Ofili’s celebrated No Woman No Cry, of 1998. For good measure, the cover of the magazine featured a full page detail of Ofili’s Third Eye Vision, 1999.

From the text: “Chris Ofili’s paintings are joyous things to behold. Dotted with bright pastel colors, layered with shiny varnish, sprinkled with glitter, their surfaces seem to dance and dazzle and shimmer and shine. Some even glow in the dark. Complex, decorative and mostly figurative, they are populated with an ever-increasing cast of characters, both real and imaginary. And, oh yes, they [the paintings] are often presented leaning against rather than hanging on the wall, supported on balls of varnished elephant dung, ythe way that over-stuffed archairs used to rest on carved wood spheres.”

The text repeated the often-told anecdote that Ofili “began to use [elephant dung] after making a six-week British Council-sponsored trip to Zimbabwe in 1992, when he was still a student at London’s Royal College of Art.”

Related people

»  Lynn MacRitchie

Born in Glasgow, date unknown

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Yinka Shonibare: Art in America cover/review June/July 2008

Review relating to an exhibition, 2008
Published by: Art in America
Year published: 2008
Number of pages: 1

image of Yinka Shonibare: Art in America cover/review June/July 2008

This review of an exhibition by Yinka Shonibare MBE appeared in Art in America, June/July 2008, on page 189. Titled Yinka Shonibare at James Cohan, the exhibition in question was Prospero’s Monsters, held at James Cohan Gallery, New York, 17 April  - 17 May 2008. The review was written by Faye Hirsch and came with a reproduction of Shonibare’s The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters (America), 2008, C-print on aluminium, 72 by 49 1/2 inches, at James Cohan. A detail of the work was reproduced on the cover of the magazine.

From the review: “According to Yinka Shonibare MBE (who always uses his honorific, relishing the irony of its placement after his patently un-English name), “Prospero’s Monsters,” the title of his recent exhibition, refers to the colonialist implications of Caliban in The Tempest. Neither Caliban or Prospero made an appearance in the show, but Shonibare, who has spent his life straddling worlds  (he was raised in Nigeria and England and is a fixture in the global art scene), continues cleverly to upend the tropes of Western art and history through quotation and parody. Monsters like Caliban might be grotesque hybrids, but as Shonibare has repeatedly demonstrated, hybridity is a condition of expressive possibility.”

Related people

»  Yinka Shonibare MBE RA

Born, 1962 in London, England

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  James Cohan Gallery

New York, New York, USA, United States of America

The Shadows Took Shape

Review relating to an exhibition, 2014
Published by: Art in America
Year published: 2014
Number of pages: 2

image of The Shadows Took Shape

Two-page review of The Shadows Took Shape - an exhibition held at Studio Museum in Harlem, 14 November  - 9 March 2014. The review was written by Miriam Atkin and appeared in the March 2014 issue of Art in America, on pages 145-146. From the review: “The Shadows Took Shape,” which borrows its title from a poem by the renowned jazz musician Sun Ra, is an exhibition about channeling technological visions not toward commodity culture - the standard beneficiary of scientific ingenuity - but toward a release from present constraints into a broadly self-determined future. Studio Museum assistant curator Naima J. Keith and independent curator Zoe Whitley have collected 60 works by 29 international artists around the concept of “Afrofuturism,” a term coined in 1994 by theorist Mark Dery to indicate an aesthetic mode that intermngles pan-African concerns with science fiction and fantasy imagery. Nodding to the reigning influence of Sun Ra’s 1972 mytho-satirical sci-fi film, Space is the Place, the show gives much attention to the moving image. as a whole, the film and video program, including works by [John] Akomfrah, Wanuri Kahui, Wangechi Mutu, the Otolith Group and Larissa Sansour being screeened sequentially in the downstairs gallery, provides a useful, essayistic background to the show’s theme.”

The review was illustrated by a still from John Akomfrah’s The Last Angel of History, 1996, the work with which Atkin began her review.

Related exhibitions

»  The Shadows Took Shape

Group show at Studio Museum in Harlem. 2013 - 2014

Related venues

»  Studio Museum in Harlem

New York, United States of America

Facing History (Barbara Chase-Riboud)

Review relating to an exhibition, 2014
Published by: Art in America
Year published: 2014
Number of pages: 6

image of Facing History (Barbara Chase-Riboud)

Substantial six-page review of Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Malcolm X Steles, exhibition at Philadelphia Museum of Art, September 14 2013 - January 20 2014, then Berkeley Art Museum, February 12, 2014 - April 27, 2014. The review appeared in Art in America, March 2014, pages 122 - 127. On the contents page of the issue, Facing History (written by Judith E. Stein) was trailed as “Juxtaposing disparate materials, Barbara Chase-Riboud’s abstract “Malcolm X” sculptures recall - and seek to transcend - the often bloody struggles of the Civil Rights era.” This was a significant and far-reaching appraisal of an intriguing artist.

The review began with a brief biographical sketch that situated Chase-Riboud: The 1960s were barely slipping into history when the African-American sculptor Barbara Chase-Riboud made her New York solo debut at the Bertha Schaefer Gallery on East 57th Street in 1970. A Philadelphian trained at her city’s Tyler School of Art (1956) and at Yale University (1960), Chase-Riboud had been living in France during the tumultuous ‘60s, disengaged from the Pop ironies and Minimalist concerns of her contemporaries. She had raised a family  and traveled internationally with photographer Marc Riboud, her husband at the time. In the course of those 10 years, she stepped away from the figure toward an expressive vocabulary of crimps and crevices. A two-stage breakthrough led to what would become her signature style.”

This was a significant and important review, which stands as a particularly engaging and expansive reflection on the artist. Towards the end of the piece, Stein noted, “The Newark Museum preciently purchased Malcolm X #2 in 1971; and in 2001 the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s late director Anne d’Harnoncourt acquired Malcolm X #3 for her institution. In 2003, after a gap of 34 years, Chase-Riboud began to add to the “Malcolm” series, today numbering 13 pieces. She now refers to them as “Malcolm steles (with the X silent),” the better to align them with ancient commemorative tablets and to reach for a universal significance, beyond the particular reference to one inspirational civil rights leader.”

Related people

»  Barbara Chase-Riboud

Born, 1936 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Related venues

»  Studio Museum in Harlem

New York, United States of America