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Showing 7 items related to The Independent



A voyage across the trade routes

Article relating to an exhibition, 1992
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1992
Unpaginated.

image of A voyage across the trade routes

A4 landscape single sheet photocopied from original/The Independent/Wednesday 11 November 1992/page 18/Arts/Article in response to the exhibition Trophies of Empire at the Bluecoat, Liverpool

Title: A voyage across the trade routes
Subtitle: An exhibition in Liverpool finds one of the oldest black communities in Europe reflecting on its past. Rosie Millard reports.

From the article: “The black population in Liverpool is one of the oldest black communities in Europe; Badwi points out that its roots were founded in the days of slavery, when cargo ships, full of sugar, cotton or tobacco would regularly dock in Britain’s busiest port. By the end of the 18th century, Liverpool was responsible for over half of Britain’s slave trade and nearly half of Europe’s.” “The exhibition has attracted a significantly high attendance; Bryan Biggs, who curated it, feels that it articulates concerns which the city does not often register.”

Related people + view all 7

»  Rita Keegan

Born, 1949 in New York, USA

»  Veena Stephenson

Born, 1962

Related exhibitions

»  Trophies of Empire

Group show at The Bluecoat Gallery. 1992

Related venues

»  The Bluecoat Gallery

Liverpool, United Kingdom

Pride and prejudice

Review relating to an exhibition, 1989
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1989
Number of pages: 1

image of Pride and prejudice

Single sheet A3 landscape/monochrome photocopy from original/Review from The Independent, Tuesday 5 December, 1989 - Arts Section p.19.

Title: Pride and Prejudice
Subtitle: Andrew Graham Dixon on The Other Story at the Hayward and Anish Kapoor at the Lisson Gallery

Review contains a reproduction of a painting with the following caption: “Untitled work by Gavin Jantjes (1989); juxtaposing one of Picasso’s Demoiselles d“Avignon with the “primitive“ mask that was a source of inspiration”
Largely critical review - in view of the thematic and of the artwork shown. An extract from the text: “The criticism often levelled at against such work is that it represents the immigrant artist’s inability to assimilate the Western modernist tradition, which he copies uncomprehendingly. That particular scenario - Simple Immigrant Baffled by the West - doesn’t fit the facts. None of these artists is particularly unsophisticated; you just get the impression that their work is uninteresting, and that race has nothing to do with it. It is tame and derivative, but so is the work of most second rate artists,whether they come from Neasden or Manila.”

Related people + view all 25

»  Frank Bowling OBE, RA

Born, 1935 - 1937 (probably 1936) in British Guiana (now Guyana) Caribbean/S. America

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Lubaina Himid MBE, CBE

Born, 1954 in Zanzibar, Tanzania

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Cornerhouse

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Hayward Gallery

London, United Kingdom

»  Manchester City Art Gallery

Manchester, United Kingdom

»  Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Wolverhampton, United Kingdom

Every one’s a winner

Article relating to an exhibition, 1998
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1998
Unpaginated.

image of Every one’s a winner

Original broadsheet clipping/monchrome type on newsprint wth full colour illustrations/article written in relation to the Turner Prize nominations of 1998 and the exhibition that accompanies the prize.

Title: Every one’s a winner
subtitle: for the first time in its history, the Turner Prize feels like a proper show. Even if they do still pretend that it’s an art award.
Author: Tom Lubbock
Source: The Independent, 3 November 1998, The Tuesday Review/Visual Arts, pp.11

Article contains a number of photographic reproductions - with the following credits: Top: Atlantic by Sam Taylor Wood; then from left, Cogent Shuddering by Cathy de Monchaux, The Roaring Forties by Tacita Dean and Innervisions by Chris Ofili.

Article discusses some of the issues that the judges face when nominating artists for the prize and provides an overview of the exhibition - describing the work of each artist. From the article: “Chris Ofili’s super-encrusted, entertainment-packed, open-house paintings hardly need introducing now. They were in Sensation; he had a show in Southampton early this year, and another at the Serpentine which has only just closed.” “Cathy de Monchaux had a show at the Whitechapel last year and I didn’t like it much then either. The main hit is the fusion of sharp metal work and (seemingly) live tissue, as in Cognant Shuddering, which looks like flayed rabbits…” “Sam Taylor-Wood had some work in Sensation; otherwise it’s only been seen abroad. It’s the most Young British Artist thing in the show.” “Tacita Dean is the least famous candidate. She’s not owned by Saatchi, and she hasn’t had a solo show in in a top public gallery.”

Related people

»  Tacita Dean

Born, 1965 in Canterbury, UK

»  Cathy de Monchaux

Born, 1960 in London, UK

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

»  Sam Taylor-Wood

Born, 1967 in London, England

Related exhibitions

»  Turner Prize 1998

Group show at Tate Britain. 1998 - 1999

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Portrait in elephant dung wins Turner Prize

Article relating to an exhibition, 1998
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1998
Number of pages: 1

image of Portrait in elephant dung wins Turner Prize

Original article (on front page of newspaper)/monochrome type with full colour image on newsprint/short announcement/statement precluding a full article within the paper.

Title: Portrait in elephant dung wins Turner Prize
Author: David Lister (arts news editor)
Source: The Independent, Wednesday, 2 December 1998 p.1
Article contains a colour reproduction of a painting by Chris Ofili with the following caption: “No Woman No Cry, by Turner Prize winner Chris Ofili. The figure has an elephant-dung pendant.”

Article briefly describes the winner, his work, in particular the image reproduced next to the article, and the other artists Ofili beat to win the prize. The author also lists the individuals who made up the Jury. From the article: “The Turner Prize exhibition contains one of his most topical and powerful paintings, No Woman No Cry, a black woman crying with every tear containing a picture of the murdered black teenager, Stephen Lawrence. It was intended to portray universal grief and suffering with particular attention to the black community. But as he worked, he became increasingly aware of the Lawrence inquiry and, according to the Tate curator, Virginia Button, aware of the image of Doreen Lawrence often in tears, and brought this into his painting.”

Related people

»  Tacita Dean

Born, 1965 in Canterbury, UK

»  Cathy de Monchaux

Born, 1960 in London, UK

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

»  Sam Taylor-Wood

Born, 1967 in London, England

Related exhibitions

»  Turner Prize 1998

Group show at Tate Britain. 1998 - 1999

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Chris Ofili

Article relating to an exhibition, 2002
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 2002
Unpaginated.

image of Chris Ofili

Original clipping from broadsheet newspaper/monochrome type with photograph/article in relation to an exhibition

Title: ‘Dung Artist’ Ofili to fly the flag at Venice Biennale
Author: James Morrison, Arts and Media Correspondent
Source: The Independent on Sunday, 21 July 2002, p.6

Short article announcing that Chris Ofili had been selected to represent Britain at the 50th Venice Biennale. From the article: “Now Turner Prize winning artist whose Holy Virgin Mary scandalised New York polite society, has been selected to represent Britain at one of the world’s most prestigious art shows.”
The article goes into detail about the ‘scandal’ in New York: “Dubbed ‘the elephant man’, Ofili staked his claim to be part of the Brit Art establishment when, in 1999, he outraged New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani by showing his notorious Holy Virgin Mary painting at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.”

Related people

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  The British Pavilion, Venice

Venice, Italy

The Turner Prize has scraped the bottom of its gimmicky barrel

Review relating to an exhibition, 1999
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1999
Unpaginated.

image of The Turner Prize has scraped the bottom of its gimmicky barrel

Original clipping from broadsheet newspaper/monochrome text and photograph on newsprint/review in relation to the winner of that year’s Turner Prize being announced the previous evening.

Title: The Turner Prize has scraped the bottom of its gimmicky barrel
Author: David Lee (editor of Art Review)
Source: The Independent, The Wednesday Review, 1 December, 1999
Article contains a photograph of part of the installed gallery exhibition with the following caption: “Moving images? Steven Pippin’s artworks are ‘about as avant-garde as Ted Heath’”

Comment piece about the Turner Prize and how nominees are selected, the writer suggests that the secretive nature of the selection perpetuates a type of ‘club’ of contemporary artists validated by Tate Gallery. From the text: “Whichever body of work had been awarded the prize last night, however, it will leave us none the wiser as to what pertinence it has to our lives - let alone how the final decision was arrived at and what criteria were used to judge Steve McQueen’s work better that the efforts of the also-rans. It would have been educative indeed to have been a fly on the wall of the Tate director’s office yesterday afternoon while the judges - whose parti-pris credentials are scrupulously checked in order that no hint of art recognisable to the majority should slip through the shortlist - discussed the relative merits of the work on offer.”

Related people

»  Tracey Emin

Born, 1963 in Croydon, UK

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK

»  Steven Pippin

Born, 1960 in Redhill, Surrey UK

»  Jane & Louise Wilson

Born, 1967 in Newcastle, UK

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Aubrey Williams Obituary The Independent

Obituary relating to an individual, 1990
Published by: The Independent
Year published: 1990
Number of pages: 1

image of Aubrey Williams Obituary The Independent

Substantial obituary on Aubrey Williams, that appeared in The Independent, Tuesday 1 May 1999, in the Gazette section. This is an original clipping, the page number is 15.

In the text, Brett revisits a number of the sentiments and ideas he has expressed, about Williams and his art, in other texts that were previously published.  Though the piece was written some two-plus decades, the extent to which Williams has posthumously been incorporated into the British art world is striking. Writes Brett, “There is as yet no work by Williams in the Tate Gallery. Historical and artistic changes we have been living through in the past 40 years have still not sunk into the national psyche. There has never yet been the opportunity to compare directly the abstract paintings produced by Williams with those of his fellow “English” artists working at the same time and in the same place, like Victor Pasmore, Alan Davie, Peter Lanyon or Patrick Heron.”

Brett concludes his obituary with, “The global ecological crisis was something he felt deeply. It was always coming up in his conversation: he would often take off and describe a bird, or the quality of the air in the rain forest, with inimitable precision and poetry. But he was not a doom merchant.  He had, equally strongly, a sense of possibility and of danger. In this the painting and the person were one.”

The piece is accompanied by a sizeable photograph of Williams, with the line, All-consuming fire: Williams at an exhibition of his work at the Commonwealth Institute, London, 1981 Photograph: Val Wilmer

Related people

»  Guy Brett

»  Aubrey Williams

Born, 1926 in Georgetown, Guyana. Died, 1990

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom