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Showing 4 items related to Pentonville Gallery



Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home

Collaboration at The Pentonville Gallery. 1987
Date: 7 August, 1987 until 5 September, 1987
Organiser: Pentonville Gallery

From the Press Release for this exhibition: 

“This is a show about policing. More specifically this is a show charting the growing catalogue of atrocities which have punctuated the recent history of policing in this country. It is not only the slide towards a more paramilitary style of public order policing which is of concern to us here. It is also the increased scope of that policing. Tactics and technologies first bloded (sic) in the North of Ireland, then imported and perfected against Black people in this country, have in recent years been employed with vigour against sectors of the population as diverse as striking miners and travelling hippies.

Whether this represents an increased democratisation of brutality is open to debate, what it does mean is that for an increasingly large section of the community the possibility of becoming the subject of such policing is brought closer to home. It is also in the realm of personal policing that atrocity has been brought closer to home. Where as previously the common sense assumption was that if you were young, male and black, if you dressed in an unorthadox (sic) way or moved in a group of more than one, if you stood on a street corner, or on a picket line, if you choose to excercise your democratic right of protest, then you run the risjk of over vigours (sic) policing. Our mothers would often tell us to look respectable, keep good company, stay home and keep off the streets. In Autumn 1985, all of these assumptions were blown out of the window.

The homes which we had been told were havens of safety were entered by policemen bearing arms. One mother was shot and paralysed, another was killed. Atrocity had been brought not just close to home, but into the home. The cases of Chery Groce and Cynthia Jarrett make chilling reading. However, this is not the full story, but it is the starting point for this show.

KEITH PIPER and DONALD RODNEY are BLK artists who have decided to jointly stage shows around issues of shared concern. First exhibiting together as members of the BLK ART Group in the early eighties, they have maintained the conviction that their work should discuss issues of personal and collective relevance. THIS IS THEIR FIRST JOINT SHOW.”

The exhibition garnered a significant amount of press coverage.

 

Related items + view all 7

click to show details of Donald Rodney and Keith Piper (Pentonville)

»  Donald Rodney and Keith Piper (Pentonville)

Review relating to an exhibition, 1987

click to show details of Pentonville: Adventures Close to Home - review

»  Pentonville: Adventures Close to Home - review

Review relating to an exhibition, 1987

click to show details of Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - opening party card

»  Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - opening party card

Invite relating to an exhibition, 1987

click to show details of Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - press release

»  Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - press release

Press release relating to an exhibition, 1987

click to show details of Walk-in riot requiem

»  Walk-in riot requiem

Review relating to an exhibition, 1987

People in this exhibition

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Exhibition venues

»  The Pentonville Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - press release

Press release relating to an exhibition, 1987
Published by: Pentonville Gallery
Year published: 1987
Number of pages: 1
Unpaginated.

image of Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - press release

From the Press Release for this exhibition: 

“This is a show about policing. More specifically this is a show charting the growing catalogue of atrocities which have punctuated the recent history of policing in this country. It is not only the slide towards a more paramilitary style of public order policing which is of concern to us here. It is also the increased scope of that policing. Tactics and technologies first bloded (sic) in the North of Ireland, then imported and perfected against Black people in this country, have in recent years been employed with vigour against sectors of the population as diverse as striking miners and travelling hippies.

Whether this represents an increased democratisation of brutality is open to debate, what it does mean is that for an increasingly large section of the community the possibility of becoming the subject of such policing is brought closer to home. It is also in the realm of personal policing that atrocity has been brought closer to home. Where as previously the common sense assumption was that if you were young, male and black, if you dressed in an unorthadox (sic) way or moved in a group of more than one, if you stood on a street corner, or on a picket line, if you choose to excercise your democratic right of protest, then you run the risjk of over vigours (sic) policing. Our mothers would often tell us to look respectable, keep good company, stay home and keep off the streets. In Autumn 1985, all of these assumptions were blown out of the window.

The homes which we had been told were havens of safety were entered by policemen bearing arms. One mother was shot and paralysed, another was killed. Atrocity had been brought not just close to home, but into the home. The cases of Chery Groce and Cynthia Jarrett make chilling reading. However, this is not the full story, but it is the starting point for this show.

KEITH PIPER and DONALD RODNEY are BLK artists who have decided to jointly stage shows around issues of shared concern. First exhibiting together as members of the BLK ART Group in the early eighties, they have maintained the conviction that their work should discuss issues of personal and collective relevance. THIS IS THEIR FIRST JOINT SHOW.”

 

Related people

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  The Pentonville Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - opening party card

Invite relating to an exhibition, 1987
Published by: Pentonville Gallery
Year published: 1987
Unpaginated.

image of Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home - opening party card

Simple card for opening party for Piper & Rodney: Adventures Close to Home, a collaborative exhibition by Keith Per and Donald Rodney, that took place at the Pentonville Gallery, London. The exhibition took place 6 August - 5 September 1987 (though the year was not mentioned on the card).

Related people

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

»  Donald Rodney

Born, 1961 in Birmingham, England. Died, 1998

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  The Pentonville Gallery

London, United Kingdom

Lubaina Himid: A Fashionable Marriage poster/brochure

Brochure relating to an exhibition, 1986
Published by: Pentonville Gallery
Year published: 1986
Unpaginated.

image of Lubaina Himid: A Fashionable Marriage poster/brochure

A3 size poster/brochure for A Fashionable Marriagea solo exhibition by Lubaina Himid that took place at Pentonville Gallery. The exhibition was a late 20th century reworking of Hogarth’s fourth painting in his celebrated mid 18th century  series, Marriage a La Mode. The painting in question The Toilette (the name on its frame), was called The countess’s morning levee. The painting had recently (in 1985) been used on the cover of David Dabydeen’s Hogarth’s Blacks: Images of Blacks in Eighteenth Century English Art (Dangaroo Press). The poster for Himid’s exhibition doubled as the exhibition’s brochure, with information on the reverse. The four sections of the brochure text began with a sentence or two about Hogarth with references to publications on  the artist. The second section was a visual guide to how Himid’s re-imagined characters could be read. The third section was a summary of the exhibition, and the fourth section was a brief Himid CV, though her name was twice misspelt as ‘Lubainia’.

The first section stated that “Hogarth loathed everyone and everything that wasn’t English, however what he bequeathed Black people, inadvertently, was some visible documentation of our contribution to and existence in British life.” The third section’s text began with a brief description of the Hogarth painting on which her reworking was based. “It shows a world of masquerade and illicit affairs. The Countess is in her bedroom having her hair done with her lover, Silvertongue the lawyer; her husband is away. The musical entertainment which ‘covers’ their liason (sic) is provided by a famous castrato of the day. The audience ranges from the bored to the ridiculous. On the walls are paintings of rape scenes ‘balanced’ by a portrait of an eminent clergyman. The Black slave/servants serve refreshments, decorate the room with their presence and witness the scene.”

The text went on to summarize Himid’s reworking, locating it firmly within mid 1980s ploitical realities.” In the 1986 version A Fashionable Marriage Margaret Thatcher throws herself towards the reclining/declining Reagan and allows herself to be invited to a masked ball - World War III - Nucleear Holocaust. The art world, maintaining the staus quo, sings on. The critic has an eager listener in the ‘feminist’ mega-artiste and as his accompanist the dealer/collector. As his nervous mimic the sideways glancing funding body. In the background mirroring Thatchers (sic) lackey is the angst/complacent school of British painting. On the walls the pornographic Picasso’s (sic) of rape are given ‘an air of respectability’ by his portrait of Gertrude Stein. The Black artist pours energy and time into white institutions and systems of approval and reward. However the key to the piece and the answer to the predicament the Black people find themselves in is resistance and unity. In recognising the individual/british (sic) situation as part of a wider global politic an international commitment to change is illustrated in the figure of the child seated foreground with the necessary weapons.”

Related people

»  Lubaina Himid MBE

Born, 1954 in Zanzibar, Tanzania

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  The Pentonville Gallery

London, United Kingdom