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Showing 5 items related to Third Text



Isaac Julien | Looking for Langston

Article relating to an exhibition, 1990
Published by: Third Text
Year published: 1990
ISBN: ISSN 0952 - 8822
Unpaginated.

image of Isaac Julien | Looking for Langston

Article within journal/Third Text/issue 12/Autumn 1990/p.59-71

Title: Isaac Julien: Looking for Langston - Montage of a Dream Deferred
Auhor: Tony Fisher
ISSN 0952 - 8822 © 1990 Third Text

The article contains a number of still images from the film. The journal also contains an interview between Tony Fisher and Isaac Julian from p.65 - 71.

Related people + view all 6

»  Martina Attille

Born, 1959 in St Lucia

»  Isaac Julien

Born, 1960 in London, England

»  Sankofa

Related exhibitions

»  Looking for Langston

Film 1989

Third Text: Art and Immigration

Journal relating to a publication, 1991
Published by: Third Text
Year published: 1991
Unpaginated.

image of Third Text: Art and Immigration

Slightly smaller than A4 portrait softcover journal/monochrome type and images with blue and red text on the cover/journal produced around contemporary issues in art.

Title: Third Text: Art and Immigration, Special Issue
Source: Third Text, Third world perspectives on contemporary art and culture, issue 15, Summer 1991
Published: Kala Press, typeset by Emset, London. © 1991 Third Text
Editor: Rasheed Araeen; Associate Editor: Jean Fisher; Editorial Assistants: Tony Fisher, Nikos Papastergiadis

From the editorial “ This special issue comprises papers from the conference ‘British Art In A Century of Immigration’ which was organised by Lynda Checketts in Norwich on 15-16 March 1991. To coincide with the conference, Checketts also organised an exhibition, curated by Eddie Chambers, History and Identity, representing a selection of contemporary young black artists. The essays trace the trajectory and comment on the implications of various migrations in recent British history: those migrations that followed the Jewish pogroms and rise of fascism in Northern and Eastern Europe during the early decades of the 20th Century; and the post - 1945 migration of peoples from African, Caribbean and Asian countries that had been under British colonial rule.”

Contents:
Lynda Checketts: British Art in a Century of Immigration: Introduction - 5
Monica Bohm-Duchen: The Stranger within the Gates - 11
Rasheed Araeen: The Other Immigrant: The Experiences & Achievements of AfroAsian Artists in the Metropolis - 17
Juliet Steyn: Mods, Yids and Foreigners - 29
Willi Guttsman: The influence & Failure of Weimer Radicalism in Emigré Art in Britain - 39
Cordula Frowein: German Artists in War-Time Britain - 47
Elizabeth Shaw: Radical Emigré Artists and Their Return to DDR - 57
Eddie Chambers: History & Identity - 63
Gilane Tawadros: Black Women in Britain: A Personal & Intellectual Journey - 71
Sarat Maharaj: The Congo is Flooding the Acropolis: Art in Britain of the Immigration - 77
Eddie Chambers: Black Art Now - 91

Related people

»  Rasheed Araeen

Born, 1935 in Karachi, Pakistan

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Jean Fisher

Born, 1962 in USA

»  Sarat Maharaj (Professor)

Born, 1951 in South Africa

»  Gilane Tawadros

Born, 1959

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Lincolnshire College of Art and Design

Lincoln, United Kingdom

»  Norwich Gallery

Norwich, United Kingdom

Permindar Kaur | Cold Comfort - Eddie Chambers’ review

Review relating to an exhibition, 1996
Published by: Third Text
Year published: 1996
Number of pages: 2

image of Permindar Kaur | Cold Comfort - Eddie Chambers’ review

Cold Comfort, Permindar Kaur, review by Eddie Chambers, Third Text, pp 91 - 94. 3 monochgrome reproductions.

Related people

»  Permindar Kaur

Born, 1965 in Nottingham, England

Related exhibitions

»  Cold Comfort

Solo show at The Bluecoat Gallery. 1996

»  Cold Comfort Part I

Solo show at Ikon Gallery. 1996

Related venues

»  The Bluecoat Gallery

Liverpool, United Kingdom

»  Ikon Gallery

Birmingham, United Kingdom

»  Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre

Coventry, United Kingdom

Conversation with Aubrey Williams

Article relating to an individual, 1987
Published by: Third Text
Year published: 1987
Number of pages: 28

image of Conversation with Aubrey Williams

Conversation with Aubrey Williams, Rasheed Araeen, Third Text No. 2, Winter 1987, pp. 25 - 52.

This conversation with Williams appeared in the second issue of Third Text and is of incalculable importance. In marked contrast to texts about Williams written during his lifetime, posthumous texts on the artist have grown ever more bulky and grandiose. In this regard, the Third Text conversation was by far the most substantial text on Williams produced during his lifetime, in which Williams’ own voice, opinions, expressions are unedited and respectfully presented to the reader. Extracts from this interview have been reproduced in several publications on Williams, in particular, Guyana Dreaming, and Aubrey Williams, the catalogue, edited by Reyahn King, that accompanied the joint exhibitions Aubrey Williams: Atlantic Fire, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, 15 January - 11 April 2010, and Aubrey Williams: Now and Coming Time, October Gallery, London, 4 February - 3 April 2010.

The text was illustrated with 9 reproductions of Williams’ paintings.

An extract from the Conversation, as follows:

Rasheed Araeen: Aubrey, could you tell us something about your life in Guyana before you came to Britain, particularly in relation to your aspirations to be a professional artist. Where did the aspirations copme from?

Aubrey Williams: Your opening is so complex; it’s mind-boggling. To start with we in Guyana have no true concept of inspiration. It’s too modern. It’s synthetic and too romantic in the English romantic sense. It has very little to do with making images…

Related people

»  Rasheed Araeen

Born, 1935 in Karachi, Pakistan

»  Aubrey Williams

Born, 1926 in Georgetown, Guyana. Died, 1990

Related venues

»  The Bluecoat Gallery

Liverpool, United Kingdom

»  Ikon Gallery

Birmingham, United Kingdom

»  Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre

Coventry, United Kingdom

Beyond Cultural Diversity: The Case for Creativity

Book relating to a publication, 2010
Published by: Third Text
Year published: 2010
Number of pages: 152
ISBN: 978-0-947753-11-5

image of Beyond Cultural Diversity: The Case for Creativity

This was in many respects a curious publication. Extensively illustrated with key works by leading British artists of African, Asian and Caribbean backgrounds, the volume consisted of a series of substantial texts by the likes of Rasheed Araeen, Jean Fisher, and Leon Wainwright. The texts were though, framed within the context of debates around ‘cultural diversity’. Rather than providing, as claimed, “a definitive critique of cultural diversity” the publication in effect underlines and emphasises the extent to which so many Black artists were trapped within the hegemonic construct of ‘cultural diversity’. As such, the publication takes its place in a long line of ‘cultural diversity’ documents produced by the Arts Council, over a period of several decades. Rather than confidently looking “ahead to an inclusive history of modern British art”, Beyond Cultural Diversity: The Case for Creativity perhaps emphasises Black artists’ ongoing struggles to achieve said inclusion. Araeen had in previous decades been a formidable critic of ‘ethnic arts’, the forerunner of cultural diversity. The journal he founded, Third Text, had distinguished itself as challenging the constraining ways in which ‘ethnic arts’ operated. But this publication, issued under the umbrella of Third Text, saw a perhaps unlikely unification between the Arts Council, Third Text, Rasheed Araeen, and the hegemony of ‘cultural diversity’. Rather than charting a definitive course, the publication fell some way short of critiques of cultural diversity such as Richard Hylton’s ‘The Nature of the Beast’. A number of the texts seek to tread a fine line between critiquing ‘cultural diversity’, and by default, promoting it.

Though the texts are confused, and indeed the publication itself is confusing, Beyond Cultural Diversity: The Case for Creativity, offers insights and recollections about the emergence and presence of Black artists in Britain. (Surprisingly, Araeen, in one of his texts, claims that Keith Piper was “born in Britain”, though Piper was in fact born in Malta.)

Beyond Cultural Diversity: The Case for Creativity. A Third Text Report compiled and edited by Richard Appagnanesi. From the back cover of the publication: “Cultural diversity has been criticised for failing to deliver on the promise of a truly cohesive British society. This Third Text Report investigates official arts and culture policy concerning diversity over the last thirty years or more. The skills and experiences of the contributors to the Report in their fields of practice have equipped them to address the relevant contemporary issues of art history, art education, community programming, state and institutional arts policy and management, with a view to going beyond cultural diversity and making their case for the renewal of creativity in Britain today. The Report, commissioned by Arts Council England, provides a definitive critique of cultural diversity and looks ahead to an inclusive history of modern British art. The time has come for a long overdue shift away from mainstream Eurocentricity towards a creative case for diversity that acknowledges hitherto neglected and marginalised contributions to the development of contemporary arts practice. The Report argues that a break with official policies of cultural diversity does not mean a return to ‘business as usual’ for the arts establishment but a deeper understanding of the intrinsic value of diversity in the arts.

Contributors: Richard Appignanesi, Rasheed Araeen, Andrew Dewdney, David Dibosa, Jean Fisher, Hassan Mahamadallie, Roshi Naidoo, Tony Panayiotou, Leon Wainwright and Victoria Walsh.”

Contents as follows:

Tony Panayiotou, Preface

Introducing the Creative Case

Richard Appignanesi, Introduction: ‘Whose Culture?’ Exposing the Myth of Cultural Diversity

Rasheed Araeen, Cultural Diversity, Creativity and Modernism

The Missing History in Cultural Diversity

Rasheed Araeen, Ethnic Minorities, Multiculturalism and Celebration of the Postcolonial Other

Jean Fisher, Cultural Diversity and Institutional Policy

Towards an Inclusive British Community

Roshi Naidoo, Diversity after Diversity

Andrew Dewdney, David Dibosa and Victoria Walsh, Cultural Inequality, Multicultural Nationalism and Global Diversity: Tate Encounters: Britishness and Visual Culture

Leon Wainwright, Art (School) Education and Art History

Hassan Mahamdallie, Breaking the Code: New Approaches to Diversity and Equality in the Arts

Richard Appignanesi, Conclusion: What is to be Done?

Notes

Contributors

Further Reading

The cover design was by Richard Dyer, and the photograph was by Adrian Clark. It appeared to show a Union flag, rendered in alternative colours.

Related people + view all 10

»  Rasheed Araeen

Born, 1935 in Karachi, Pakistan

»  Jean Fisher

Born, 1962 in USA

Related venues

»  The Bluecoat Gallery

Liverpool, United Kingdom

»  Ikon Gallery

Birmingham, United Kingdom

»  Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre

Coventry, United Kingdom