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The Meaning of Style - New Art exchange

Group show at Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange. 2010
Date: 16 January, 2010 until 10 April, 2010
Curator: David Schischka Thomas
Organiser: New Art Exchange

The Meaning of Style: Black British Style, and the underlying political and social environment was a group exhibition of paintings and photography that sought to describe, comment on, and critique the image of the Black/African-Caribbean male in British society. Amongst the exhibitors, Vanley Burke was represented by a number of his vintage monochrome works produced in the 1970s and early 1980s, documenting the lives of Black Brummies and other people reflective of Birmingham’s changing demographics. Alongside these photographs were recent colour images documenting aspects of the manifestation and consequences of gang-culture in Birmingham. The two sets of images presented two differing manifestations of the Black British presence. Clement Cooper was represented by a selection of his striking, engaging portraits and other photographs of young people, youth culture in urban environments. Barbara Walker was represented by a number of larger canvases, paintings of young Black males, captured from the back, rather than as conventional portraits. The device was both striking and successful, allowing the viewer a particularly nuanced engagement with the individuals depicted, as well as the cultural points of reference with which these young men empathise, through dress, fashion, adornment, etc.

Elsewhere in the exhibition, there was a range of archival material - publishing, media, television that sought to contextualise the exhibition’s ideas.

 

Related items

People in this exhibition + view all 7

»  Vanley Burke

Born, 1951 in Jamaica

»  Michael Forbes

Born, 1962

»  Barbara Walker

Born, 1964 in Birmingham

Exhibition venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom

The Meaning of Style: Black British Style, and the underlying political and social environment

Announcement relating to an exhibition, 2010
Published by: New Art Exchange
Year published: 2010
Unpaginated.

image of The Meaning of Style: Black British Style, and the underlying political and social environment

Card invitation to the Launch of a group exhibition The Meaning of Style: Black British Style, and the underlying political and social environment. New Art Exchange, 16 January - 10 April 2010. The launch took place on Friday 15 january 2010, 6 - 9 pm. The image on the card was a celebrated photograph by Vanley Burke; a youngster riding his bike in a Birmingham Park, circa mid to late 1970s. The boy’s bicycle is adorned by a British flag.

(The photograph was commented on  by Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, in an essay on Burke’s work included in the Back to Black catalogue).

Related people + view all 7

»  Vanley Burke

Born, 1951 in Jamaica

»  Clement Cooper

Born, 1965 in Manchester, England

»  Michael Forbes

Born, 1962

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom

Next We Change Earth

Group show at New Art Exchange. 2008
Date: 6 September, 2008 until 26 October, 2008
Curator: David Schischka Thomas/Michael Forbes
Organiser: New Art Exchange

Curated by  David Schischka Thomas and Michael Forbes, Next We Change Earth was the inaugural exhibition of New Art Exchange, a new visual arts space that opened in Hyson Green, Nottingham in the autumn of 2008. The dates of the exhibition were 6 September - 26 October 2008 and the exhibition included work by Forbes himself, plus Said Adrus, Elshaday Berhane, Dubmorphology with Gary Stewart, Trevor Matghison/Obinna Nwosu, Samson Kambalu, Harjeet Kaur, Hetain Patel, Keith Piper, Narir Tambouli, and Andrew Wright. The title of the exhibition came from a work by Kambalu in which he created anagrams of the words The New Art Exchange. The exhibition featured artists all of whom had connections to the city of Nottingham.

The exhibition came with a substantial catalogue, with contextualising essay by Eddie Chambers and extensive reproductions of artists’ work. From the catalogue: “This exhibition, a bold and unique undertaking, features contributions from a range of artists with past, present or ongoing links to the city of Nottingham… When credible histories of black visual arts activity in England come to be written, Nottingham will be cited and acknowledged as having played an important role in these narratives. Central to this role has been the part played by various artists, organisations and individuals concerned with the practice and profile of black artists’ work in the city over a period of several decades. Another important factor central to Nottingham’s role in these narratives has been Trent Polytechnic (as it was, prior to becoming Nottingham Trent University) in offering places on its Fine Art degree course to students such as Said Adrus, Keith Piper, from the early 1980s onwards, through to enrolment and graduation by black students in more recent years.”

From the curators’ foreword: “I first came up with the concept of Next We Change earth, whilst researching  a period in the history of Nottingham and its relationship  with artists like Keith Piper, Donald Rodney and said Adrus. These pioneering artists are important historical figures within the British ‘Black Arts movement’. (David Schischka Thomas). “I do not want to get lost in concepts and academic theories about the work in the exhibition, for me when selecting artists for any show my main criteria is the quality, aesthetic and emotional effect of the work in a gallery space.” (Michael Forbes).

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click to show details of Next We Change Earth

»  Next We Change Earth

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2008

People in this exhibition + view all 10

»  Samson Kambalu

Born, 1975 in Malawi

Exhibition venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom

Next We Change Earth

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2008
Published by: New Art Exchange
Year published: 2008
Number of pages: 76
ISBN: 978 0 9560253

image of Next We Change Earth

Lavish and substantial catalogue, sized and shaped, A4 landscape, for Next We Change Earth, the inaugural exhibition of New Art Exchange, a new visual arts space that opened in Hyson Green, Nottingham in the autumn of 2008. The exhibition was curated by David Schischka Thomas  and Michael Forbes. The dates of the exhibition were 6 September - 26 October 2008 and the exhibition included work by Forbes himself, plus Said Adrus, Elshaday Berhane, Dubmorphology with Gary Stewart, Trevor Matghison/Obinna Nwosu, Samson Kambalu, Harjeet Kaur, Hetain Patel, Keith Piper, Narir Tambouli, and Andrew Wright. The title of the exhibition came from a work by Kambalu in which he created anagrams of the words The New Art Exchange. The exhibition featured artists all of whom had connections to the city of Nottingham.

The exhibition came with a substantial catalogue, with contextualising essay by Eddie Chambers and extensive reproductions of artists’ work. From the catalogue: “This exhibition, a bold and unique undertaking, features contributions from a range of artists with past, present or ongoing links to the city of Nottingham… When credible histories of black visual arts activity in England come to be written, Nottingham will be cited and acknowledged as having played an important role in these narratives. Central to this role has been the part played by various artists, organisations and individuals concerned with the practice and profile of black artists’ work in the city over a period of several decades. Another important factor central to Nottingham’s role in these narratives has been Trent Polytechnic (as it was, prior to becoming Nottingham Trent University) in offering places on its Fine Art degree course to students such as Said Adrus, Keith Piper, from the early 1980s onwards, through to enrolment and graduation by black students in more recent years.”

From the curators’ foreword: “I first came up with the concept of Next We Change earth, whilst researching  a period in the history of Nottingham and its relationship  with artists like Keith Piper, Donald Rodney and Said Adrus. These pioneering artists are important historical figures within the British ‘Black Arts movement’. (David Schischka Thomas). “I do not want to get lost in concepts and academic theories about the work in the exhibition, for me when selecting artists for any show my main criteria is the quality, aesthetic and emotional effect of the work in a gallery space.” (Michael Forbes).

Catalogue contents as follows:

Foreword by the New Art Exchange Chairman, Eddy Maxwell0

Foreword by the Curators, David Schischka Thomas  and Michael Forbes

Next We Change Earth, essay by Eddie Chambers

Photographic references, Acknowledgements

As mentioned, the catalogue was extensively illustrated, including before and after photographs of the site and New Art Exchange building.

 

Related people + view all 12

»  Eddie Chambers

Born, 1960 in Wolverhampton, England

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

Related exhibitions

»  Next We Change Earth

Group show at New Art Exchange. 2008

Related venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom

Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji

Solo show at Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange. 2016
Date: 16 July, 2016 until 27 September, 2016
Organiser: New Art Exchange

New Art Exchange is delighted to present as a commissioning partner, the UK premiere of Jangbar (2012/2015), a new film and sound installation by leading British visual artist and filmmaker Zarina Bhimji. This eagerly anticipated piece joins Bhimji’s portfolio of works in film, which includes the critically acclaimed Yellow Patch (2011). Jangbar, filmed on 35mm in Kenya, is 26 minutes 37 seconds long and is installed as an immersive single screen, HD projection with surround sound.

The piece is an enquiry into image, light, object, the universal, the literal and the abstract. It has grown from observation and ambiguity, yet at other moments it draws from a deep, at times bleak political consciousness of specific moments.

From the Preface to the catalogue Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji, written by Skinder Hundal, CEO, New Art Exchange.

Jangbar was commissioned by FLAMIN Productions through Film London Artists’ Moving Image Network and New Art Exchange. Supported by Arts Council England, the Dommering Foundation, ICIA University of Bath, Sfumato Foundation, Pérez Art Museum Miami and Framestore.

The exhibition came with a small but very useful colour catalogue.

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click to show details of Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji

»  Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2015

People in this exhibition

»  Zarina Bhimji

Born, 1963 in Mbarara, Uganda

Exhibition venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom

Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2015
Published by: New Art Exchange
Year published: 2015
Number of pages: 24
ISBN: 978-0-9932659-1-4

image of Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji

Small but very useful catalogue accompanying Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji, an exhibition of a newly commissioned film took place at New Art Exchange, Nottingham, 16 July - 27 September 2015.

More than half the catalogue consists of full colour stills from Jangbar. The main text in the catalogue was an essay by Franklin Sirmans, which concluded with, “As my words above attempt to lay out, to lay bare, sound, both abstract and as a content-laden spoken word, is as much an element within Bhimji’s artistic practice as the moving image. She scripts sound and works film as pliable media, like paint for a painter or clay for a sculptor. Jangbar represents the culmination of years of research and careful editing and of collected and archival material. The landscape appears as an early twenty-first century location occupied by an uncomfortable lightness of being. Now matter how lush, how colourful the scene may be, Bhimji reminds us that we have places and moments in which to imagine better even as the present keeps catching up with the past.”

Contents as follows:

Preface, written by Skinder Hundal, CEO, New Art Exchange,

Essay, “Zarina Bhimji: Metaphorically Speaking”, by Franklin Sirmans

page of extensive credits

exhibition details (including its tour to ICIA, University of Bath)

brief biographical paragraph on Zarina Bhimji.

 

New Art Exchange is delighted to present as a commissioning partner, the UK premiere of Jangbar (2012/2015), a new film and sound installation by leading British visual artist and filmmaker Zarina Bhimji. This eagerly anticipated piece joins Bhimji’s portfolio of works in film, which includes the critically acclaimed Yellow Patch (2011). Jangbar, filmed on 35mm in Kenya, is 26 minutes 37 seconds long and is installed as an immersive single screen, HD projection with surround sound.

The piece is an enquiry into image, light, object, the universal, the literal and the abstract. It has grown from observation and ambiguity, yet at other moments it draws from a deep, at times bleak political consciousness of specific moments.

From the Preface to the catalogue Jangbar - Zarina Bhimji, .

 

Related people

»  Zarina Bhimji

Born, 1963 in Mbarara, Uganda

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Art Exchange Gallery / New Art Exchange

Nottingham, United Kingdom