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Turner Prize 1998

Group show at Tate Britain. 1998 - 1999
Date: 28 October, 1998 until 10 January, 1999
Curator: Virginia Button & Michela Parkin
Organiser: Tate

Annual art prize sponsored by Channel 4 who screen the prize ceremony and announcement. Either deemed ‘boring’ or ‘controversial’. This entity again produced a large amount of publicity as the winner, Chris Ofili, was the first painter to win since Howard Hodgkin in 1985, and also the artist at this time used elephant dung in his work - cue lots of puns using ‘dung’.

List of previous winners, up to 1998: 1984 - Malcolm Morley; 1985 - Howard Hodgkin; 1986 - Gilbert and George; 1987 - Richard Deacon; 1988 - Tony Cragg; 1989 - Richard Long; 1990 - Prize suspended; 1991 - Anish Kapoor; 1992 - Grenville Davey; 1993 - Rachel Whiteread; 1994 - Damien Hirst; 1996 - Douglas Gordon; 1997 - Gillian Wearing.

Link to information about 1998 prize: www.tate.org.uk/britain/turnerprize/history/1998.shtm

Related items + view all 14

click to show details of An Ofili big adventure - Chris Ofili

»  An Ofili big adventure - Chris Ofili

Article relating to an individual, 1998

click to show details of Bottom of the *hit parade

»  Bottom of the *hit parade

Preview relating to an exhibition, 1998

click to show details of Chris Ofili - No Woman, No Cry Postcard

»  Chris Ofili - No Woman, No Cry Postcard

Postcard relating to an individual

click to show details of Turner Prize proves the ordure of day

»  Turner Prize proves the ordure of day

Article relating to an exhibition, 1998

click to show details of The Turner Prize Shortlist - Modern Painters

»  The Turner Prize Shortlist - Modern Painters

Article relating to an exhibition, 1998

People in this exhibition

»  Tacita Dean

Born, 1965 in Canterbury, UK

»  Cathy de Monchaux

Born, 1960 in London, UK

»  Chris Ofili

Born, 1968 in Manchester, UK

»  Sam Taylor-Wood

Born, 1967 in London, England

Exhibition venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Turner Prize 1999: An Exhibition of Work by the Shortlisted Artists

Group show at Tate Britain. 1999 - 2000
Date: 20 October, 1999 until 5 February, 2000
Organiser: Tate

Yearly art prize organised and hosted by TATE. 1999 jury: Bernhard Bürgli, Director of the Kunsthalle, Zurich; Sacha Craddock, writer and critic; Judith Nesbitt, Head of Programming, Whitechapel Art Gallery; Alice Rawsthorn, representative of the Patrons of New Art; Nicholas Serota, Director, Tate Gallery.

The Turner Prize 1999: An Exhibition of Work by the Shortlisted Artists. Held at the Tate Gallery. 20th October 1999 - 6th February 2000. Featured the shortlisted artists, Tracy Emin, Steve McQueen, Steven Pippin, and Jane and Louise Wilson.

The year’s winner was Steve McQueen, making him only the second Black British-born artist to win the prize. The first, Chris Ofili, had won the previous year.

Link to TATE information about this year: www.tate.org.uk/britain/turnerprize/history/1999.shtm

The exhibition was sponsored by Channel 4.

Related items

click to show details of Deadpan McQueen takes the Turner

»  Deadpan McQueen takes the Turner

Review relating to an exhibition, 1999

click to show details of Steve McQueen: Driven to abstraction

»  Steve McQueen: Driven to abstraction

Interview relating to an exhibition, 1999

click to show details of The Turner Prize has scraped the bottom of its gimmicky barrel

»  The Turner Prize has scraped the bottom of its gimmicky barrel

Review relating to an exhibition, 1999

People in this exhibition

»  Tracey Emin

Born, 1963 in Croydon, UK

»  Steve McQueen OBE, CBE

Born, 1969 in London, UK

»  Steven Pippin

Born, 1960 in Redhill, Surrey UK

»  Jane & Louise Wilson

Born, 1967 in Newcastle, UK

Exhibition venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman

Postcard relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman

Postcard of Frank Bowling’s Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman, 1968, acrylic paint on canvas, 236.4 x 129.5 cm, presented by Rachel Scott 2006. The postcard was one of a 16 postcard pack issued as part of the merchandising of the Tate’s 2012 Migrations exhibition. This work of Bowling’s was included in the exhibition. The pack contained cards of work by Benjamin West, Joseph Van Aken, James Tissot, Marcus Gheeraerts II, Jacob Kramer, Oskar Kokoschka, Kurt Schwitters, Sonia Boyce, William Rothenstein, Lubaina Himid, Jan Siberechts, Frank Bowling, Keith Piper, James Abbott McNeil Whistler, and John Singer Sargent. Frank Bowling’s Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman had, a year or two earlier, been exhibited as part of Afro Modern at Tate Liverpool.

One of the most important of Bowling’s map paintings was his 1968 work, Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman The painting was, in some ways, a profound homage to one of the giants of American abstract expressionism, and takes as its template Newman’s seminal painting of 1948, Onement, I.[i] The title of Bowling’s homage casually reflected a familiarity on Bowling’s part with the dominant personalities of contemporary art, who had made New York, their home, in much the same way as Bowling himself had. But the title also gives more than a passing nod to the Newman’s own critically acclaimed series, Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue.

Newman’s painting used what was to become his trademark approach to structuring vertical blocks of colour, demarcated by, in this instance, a slim fissure of contrasting band of colour. This was a hugely important painting, breaking as it did so many of the conventions that dominated the practice of painting, before the coming of abstract expressionism. And yet, Newman’s painting was in many ways a precise and disciplined and highly structured affair that confirmed him as a great American talent.  Bowling’s painting featured several discernible outlines of his beloved South America, overlaid with Newmanesque vertical zips of green, yellow and red, creating a highly charged and bold exploration of history and identity. The colours Bowling used related directly (or had a direct relation to) the powerful symbolism of the tricolour of red, gold and green. Since the 1970s the colours had become instant signifiers of a particular type of Black presence. Numerous flags of Africa utilised the red, gold and green colours, in a variety of compositions, but primarily as horizontal or vertical tricolours. Examples include Senegal, Ethiopia, Ghana, Rwanda, Benin, Cameroon, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Mali, and Congo. (In the case of a country such as Rwanda, the country’s red, yellow and green vertical tricolour, complete with capital R in the centre band, was replaced after the horrific period of genocide that the country went through in the mid 1990s. The replacing of the old Rwanda flag was part of the country’s attempts to shed associations with that violent and traumatic episode of its existence.)

It was though, the use of the red, gold and green colours in the Ethiopian flag, complete with the imperial Lion of Judah in the centre of the ensign, that led to the colours being so insistently used, worn, displayed and used as adornment by adherents of Rastafari, first in Jamaica and subsequently, throughout the international Black world.[iii] Within the context of Rastafari and its attendant ‘Dread’ culture, the red gold and green colours represented powerful symbolism. Published discussions of Rastas frequently alluded to the symbolism. For example, “Rastafarianism’s sacred colors are red (for the blood of the martyrs), green (for Zion’s abundant vegetation), and gold (for the wealth of Africa).”[iv]  When Rasta emerged in English cities in the mid 1970s neighbourhood, buildings, and people, all were identified by the presence of colours. Another commentator noted that “the wearing of the colours” red gold and green were a “visible symbol which denotes the Rasta… Often the colours are worn in the form of a knitted hat, but they may also be worn as a badge, as epaulettes, or woven into a cord tied round the waist.”[v] In English cities such as Liverpool, signs denoting street names in Frontline districts were painted in the colours, thereby decisively demarcating the territory. This though, was simply a version of what had long since been happening in Jamaica. “Every Rastafarian commune is identifiable by these colors which appear everywhere, even painted on the trunks of trees in the yards.”[vi]

The colours came to signify a particularly conscious type of Black presence. When worn on an individual, the colours confirmed that the wearer aspired to upful living. When adorning musical instruments such as drums, the colours signified that the drums in question were employed in the righteous task of chanting down Babylon. And when the red gold and green colours adorned dwellings, the message went out that no weakheart cannot enter. Thus, Bowling’s use of the colours evoked a multiplicity of diasporic readings that casually collided with his pronounced embrace of modernism and his respect for Abstract Expressionism.

The Black presence in South America may have been consistently denigrated, marginalised or even rendered less than visible, but in Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman, the South American land mass, as distinctive in its outline as the shape of Africa, was imagined as an unmistakably Black Diasporic space. It would though, be a serious error to suggest that Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman and other map paintings by Bowling were in any way merely illustrative, or explicit examples of pronounced social narratives. These paintings left an incredible amount to the imagination, because whilst the outlines of continents such as South America were unmistakable, other outlines of landmasses in these paintings emphatically defied conventional recognition. In this regard, Bowling not only created his own worlds by reconfiguring the world that already existed, he also created imagined new land masses, that, try as we might, we could never quite recognise as familiar parts of conventional world maps. Furthermore, whilst in Uruguayan artist Joaquin Torres-García’s Upside-down Map, South America was inverted, in a number of Bowling’s map paintings, South America sometimes appeared to have been reversed, thereby creating something that appeared at once familiar, yet not quite familiar. Whether or not Bowling’s maps were indeed reversed is a matter of visual conjecture or speculation. What is unquestionable however, is the extent to which his map paintings destabilise seemingly emphatic or monolithic constructions of the world, (or, as is the case in many instances, monolithic constructions of South America and South American identity). In other map paintings, Bowling goes further in challenging our sense of familiar cartography by presenting outlines of landmasses that look a lot like amalgamations of the outlines of the African and South American continents. And in so doing, Bowling again proposes a provocative and primary interplay between Africa and Latin America.

[i] Barnett Newman (American, 1905-1970). Onement, I, 1948. Oil on canvas and oil on masking tape on canvas, 69.2 x 41.2 cm. In the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

[ii] In the iconography of Rastafari, ‘The Lion of Judah’ symbolises the Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, who was crowned in 1930, taking the titles King of Kings, Lord of Lords, Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah, Elect of God and Power of the Trinity. Rastafarians hold Haile Selassie in the highest esteem, believing him to be a direct descendant of the Israelite Tribe of Judah, tracing his lineage through the line of King David and Solomon. Further, Rastafarians assert that Haile Selassie is the personage of the Lion of Judah mentioned in the New Testament Book of Revelation.

[iv] Nicholas J. Saunders (editor), The Peoples of the Caribbean: An Encyclopedia of Archaeology and Traditional Culture, ABC-CLIO, 2005, p. 235.

[v] John Plummer, Movement of Jah People: The Growth of the Rastafarians, Press Gang, Birmingham, 1978, p. 38

[vi] Leonard E Barrett, The Rastafarians: The Dreadlocks of Jamaica, Heinemann/Sangsters, 1977 (1982 edition), p. 143

 

Related people

»  Frank Bowling OBE, RA

Born, 1935 - 1937 (probably 1936) in British Guiana (now Guyana) Caribbean/S. America

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

»  Tate Liverpool

Liverpool, United Kingdom

Go West Young Man

Postcard relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of Go West Young Man

Postcard of Keith Piper’s Go West Young Man, photograph on paper mounted on board, 84 x 56 cm. The postcard was one of a 16 postcard pack issued as part of the merchandising of the Tate’s 2012 Migrations exhibition. This work of Piper’s was included in the exhibition. The pack contained cards of work by Benjamin West, Joseph Van Aken, James Tissot, Marcus Gheeraerts II, Jacob Kramer, Oskar Kokoschka, Kurt Schwitters, Sonia Boyce, William Rothenstein, Lubaina Himid, Jan Siberechts, Frank Bowling, Keith Piper, James Abbott McNeil Whistler, and John Singer Sargent. Keith Piper’s Go West Young Man had, a year or two earlier, been exhibited as part of Afro Modern at Tate Liverpool.

In 1987, Piper deployed the infamous Brookes of Liverpool motif in an engaging, expansive series of photomontages titled Go West Young Man. [i] The famous words, “Go West. Young Man, Go West” were first used in a newspaper editorial to encourage the westward migration of Americans, in the middle of the 19th century. According to David C. King, Westward Expansion (American Heritage, American Voices series), “in 1851, a newspaper editor named John B. L. Soule wrote those words in a newspaper, the Terre Haute [Indiana] Express. Horace Greenley, well-known editor of the New York Tribune, was so impressed by the enthusiastic editorial that he printed the entire piece in the Tribune.

In a brilliant gesture that served to counter or challenge the pathology that it was perfectly in order for the Aboriginal peoples of America to be dispossessed of their land, Piper juxtaposed the romanticised admonition of the newspaper editorial, with the image of the slave ship. In so doing, he created a plethora of new meanings. One of the most striking of these new meanings was the interplay between forced migration and perhaps more voluntary (or at least, less forced) forms of migration. The US is a country of immigrants, with two striking exceptions. Firstly, those Aboriginal peoples massacred and dispossessed of their land, and secondly, those captured Africans who arrived in chains, destined for the auction block. The romanticized memory of noble migrants, westward-bound, took no respectful account (or indeed, interest in), the woeful experiences of those two hapless groups of people. Piper though, obliges us to do so, as the slave ship represents, in the most graphic and violent of terms, forced travel, forced movement, and forced migration. It is this interplay between the sentimental portrayal of the frontiersman, and the wretched existence of the slave, that gave the first panel of Piper’s Go West Young Man, such power. Likewise, this interplay acted as a substantial and scene-setting introduction to the other thirteen parts of the historical panorama that Piper again offered.

A full-page image of Piper’s Go West Young Man appeared on one of the opening pages of the Migrations catalogue.

[i] Keith Piper, Go West Young Man, Photograph on paper mounted on board, in fourteen parts, each: 840 x 560 mm on paper, unique. Tate Collection.

[ii] David C. King, Westward Expansion (American Heritage, American Voices series), John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2003, p. 85


 

 

 

Related people

»  Keith Piper

Born, 1960 in Malta

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

»  Tate Liverpool

Liverpool, United Kingdom

Between the Two my Hearts (sic) is Balanced

Postcard relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of Between the Two my Hearts (sic) is Balanced

Postcard of Lubaina Himid’s Between the Two my Heart is Balanced, 1991, acrylic on canvas, 121.8 x 152.4 cm. The postcard was one of a 16 postcard pack issued as part of the merchandising of the Tate’s 2012 Migrations exhibition. This work of Himid’s was included in the exhibition. The pack contained cards of work by Benjamin West, Joseph Van Aken, James Tissot, Marcus Gheeraerts II, Jacob Kramer, Oskar Kokoschka, Kurt Schwitters, Sonia Boyce, William Rothenstein, Lubaina Himid, Jan Siberechts, Frank Bowling, Keith Piper, James Abbott McNeil Whistler, and John Singer Sargent. On the reverse of the postcard, the painting’s title was misspelt as Between the Two my Hearts is Balanced

The work was described, by one curator as follows: “Between the Two My Heart is Balanced is a reconception of a work by French painter James Tissot (1836-1902), which depicts two European women in a boat with a soldier. One woman is ignored, while the other holds the attention of the soldier. In Himid’s version, two women of African descent appear without the soldier’s presence. Swathed in African fabric, the women hold each other’s attention as a visible trail materializes in the boat’s wake. Himid’s boldly eloquent , painterly style is skillfully employed in her complex historical revisions. The stunning Revenge series might be viewed as an elegy for those lost during the Middle Passage, whose histories have been ignored, as well as a celebration of those who continue to survive.” Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, on Revenge (page 34 of London Bridge: Late Twentieth Century British Art and the Routes of ‘National Culture’, chapter in Transforming the Crown: African, Asian & Caribbean Artists in Britain 1966-1996, Caribbean Cultural Center, New York, 1997, pp. 16 - 45).

The Tissot painting referred to by Beauchamp-Byrd is Portsmouth Dockyard (c. 1877). Both the Tissot painting, and this Himid painting figured in the Tate exhibition of 2012, Migrations.

Related people

»  Lubaina Himid MBE

Born, 1954 in Zanzibar, Tanzania

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Rochdale Art Gallery

Rochdale, United Kingdom

»  Royal Festival Hall

London, United Kingdom

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

From Tarzan to Rambo

Postcard relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of From Tarzan to Rambo

Postcard of Sonia Boyce’s From Tarzan to Rambo: English-born ‘Native’ Considers her Relationship to the Constructed/Self Image and her Roots in Reconstruction, 1987, photograph and mixed media, 124 x 359 cm. The postcard was one of a 16 postcard pack issued as part of the merchandising of the Tate’s 2012 Migrations exhibition. This work of Boyce’s was included in the exhibition. The pack contained cards of work by Benjamin West, Joseph Van Aken, James Tissot, Marcus Gheeraerts II, Jacob Kramer, Oskar Kokoschka, Kurt Schwitters, Sonia Boyce, William Rothenstein, Lubaina Himid, Jan Siberechts, Frank Bowling, Keith Piper, James Abbott McNeil Whistler, and John Singer Sargent.

Sonia Boyce’s From Tarzan to Rambo had, a year or two earlier, been exhibited as part of Afro Modern at Tate Liverpool.

 

Related people

»  Sonia Boyce MBE

Born, 1962 in London, England

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

»  Tate Liverpool

Liverpool, United Kingdom

Migrations: Journeys into British Art - postcard pack

Postcard relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of Migrations: Journeys into British Art - postcard pack

16 postcards pack issued as part of the merchandising of the Tate’s 2012 Migrations exhibition. The pack contained cards of work by Benjamin West, Joseph Van Aken, James Tissot, Marcus Gheeraerts II, Jacob Kramer, Oskar Kokoschka, Kurt Schwitters, Sonia Boyce, William Rothenstein, Lubaina Himid, Jan Siberechts, Frank Bowling, Keith Piper, James Abbott McNeil Whistler, and John Singer Sargent.

Boyce’s image was From Tarzan to Rambo: English-born ‘Native’ Considers her Relationship to the Constructed/Self Image and her Roots in Reconstruction, 1987, photograph and mixed media, 124 x 359 cm. Himid’s image was Between the Two my Heart is Balanced, 1991, acrylic on canvas, 121.8 x 152.4 cm. Piper’s image was Go West Young Man, photograph on paper mounted on board, 84 x 56 cm, and Bowling’s image was Who’s Afraid of Barney Newman, 1968, acrylic paint on canvas, 236.4 x 129.5 cm, presented [to the Tate] by Rachel Scott 2006.

Related people + view all 15

»  Frank Bowling OBE, RA

Born, 1935 - 1937 (probably 1936) in British Guiana (now Guyana) Caribbean/S. America

»  Sonia Boyce MBE

Born, 1962 in London, England

»  John Singer Sargent

Born, 1856 in Florence, Italy. Died, 1925

»  James Jacques Joseph Tissot

Born, 1836 in Nantes, France. Died, 1902

»  Benjamin West

Born in Springfield, Pennsylvania, USA, date unknown

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Migrations: Journeys into British Art - gallery guide

Exhibition guide relating to an exhibition, 2012
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2012
Unpaginated.

image of Migrations: Journeys into British Art - gallery guide

A6 sized, folded-down brochure that accompanied the gallery guide for Migrations: Journeys into British Art, Tate Britain, 31 January - 12 August 2012. One side of the opened-up brochure featured a plan of the exhibition’s various components, and brief introductions to each section: Portraiture and New Genres; Italy, Neoclassicism and the Royal Academy; Dialogues between Britain, France and America; Jewish Artists and Jewish Art; Refugees from Nazi Europe; Artists in Pursuit of an International Language; The Dematerialised Object; New Diasporic Voices, and The Moving Image. The plan of the exhibition’s various components is intended to enable the visitor to navigate the exhibition in a chronological fashion, as well as enabling them to make the most use of the commentaries by three well-known public figures, whose contributions are featured on the other side of the gallery guide.

The guide begins with, “The exhibition explores how migration into this country has shaped the course of art in Britain over the last 500 years. Taking the form of selected ‘moments’ drawn from the Tate Collection - from 16th-century Flemish portrait painters, who came in search of new patrons, to moving image works from the early years of this century - Migrations traces both the movement of artists and the circulation of visual languages and ideas. In so doing, the exhibition raises fundamental questions about the formation of a national collection of British art against a continually shifting demographic.”

On the reverse of the gallery guide, the three commentaries appear, offered by Bonnie Greer, Michael Rosen and Shami Chakrabati.

Amongst Greer’s comments in the gallery guide: “This exhibition demonstrates how, as an island, Britain has always been influenced by the migratory - the best ideas from abroad become incorporated in the culture. I want to encourage visitors to look at the wonderful pictures but also to think about a few significant moments.” Writing about the New Diaspora Voices section of the exhibition, Greer wrote, “This art is what drew me to London. I really believed and still do that we are looking at a renaissance. I was living in New York and I saw this happening and I thought, ‘I have to come to London - this is incredible.’ These artists are uncompromising. It was important they called themselves Black. It is not just about blackness racially - it is about ‘Blackout. Next Chapter.’ No one had done this before. This is the turmoil of being British of African descent and being urban, individual, non-aligned and insouciant. This is the seed of the YBAs. These artists had the nerve to say that Britishness is fluid, not fixed. Americans don’t challenge being American in this way.”

Amongst Chakrabati’s somewhat cryptic comments in the gallery guide:”This exhibition shows that it is contentious to talk about ‘British’ art at all. Art has no borders. I think it would almost be wrong if people got to walk on this journey without some hindrance. Migration is not a freewheeling exercise and visitors should be reminded of this. Rather than wandering freely they should be stopped at moments through the show. Sometimes this experience would be pleasant, sometimes unpleasant. It would be good to show that for most people, particularly people who are not middle class artists, migration can involve a struggle. But then - I would say something ridiculously political, wouldn’t I?”

Amongst Rosen’s comments in the gallery guide: Black Audio Film Collective, Handsworth Songs 1986 (in New Diasporic Voices) “Here there is a direct analogy in the poetry of James Berry and John Agard. Their experience in verse mirrors what these artists are tackling visually. Benjamin Zephaniah is from Handsworth and is writing about these experiences too.”

The back of the folded-down brochure contains other information relating to the exhibition, credits, and other aspects of Tate Britain, such as Tate Members and Tate Patrons.

 

Related people

»  Shami Chakrabarti

Born, 1969 in London

»  Bonnie Greer OBE

Born, 1948 in Chicago

»  Michael Rosen

Born, 1946 in Harrow, London

Related exhibitions

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Turner Prize 2013

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2013
Published by: Tate
Year published: 2013
Number of pages: 36
Unpaginated.

image of Turner Prize 2013

Catalogue with full colour illustrations/unpaginated for the Turner Prize exhibition of 2013, held at Ebrington, Building 80/81, Derry/Londonderry, 23 October 2013 - 5 January 2014. Along with Laure Prouvost, Tino Sehgal, and David Shrigley, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye was shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2013. The jury consisted of Penelope Curtis, Director, Tate Britain, and Chair of the Jury, Annie Fletcher, Curator of Exhibitions, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Susanne Gaensheimer, Director MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main, Declan Long, Writer and Lecturer, National College of Art and Design, Dublin, and Ralph Rugooff, Director, Hayward Gallery, London. The award was, in due course, made to Prouvost.

Prouvost, the eventual winner was shortlisted for “her new work Wantee commissioned with Grizedale Arts for inclusion in Schwitters in Britain at Tate Britain and for her two-part installation for the Max Mara Art Prize for Women, presented in collaboration with the Whitechapel Gallery.” Sehgal was shortlisted for “his pioneering projects This variation at documenta XIII and These associations at Tate Modern.” Shrigley was shortlisted “for his solo exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, David Shrigley: Brain Activity, which offered a comprehensive overview and new perspectives on his work.” And Yiadom-Boakye was shortlisted “for her exhibition Extracts and Verses at Chisenhale Gallery.”

All the above quotes come from the introduction to the Turner Prize catalogue, which also contained introductions - both written and visual - to these artists’ work.

Contents as follows:

Brief introductions to the shortlisted artists.

Previous Winners, 1984 - present (2012’s winner Elizabeth Price being the most recent)

Jury

Foreword, by Caroline Collier, Director, Tate National

Turner Prize 2013: Derry-Londonderry, by Shona McCarthy, CEO, Culture Company

Illustrated essay on Laure Prouvost, by Aileen Burns, Curator

Illustrated essay on Tino Sehgal, by Johan Lundh, Curator

Illustrated essay on David Shrigley, by Maoliosa Boyle, Curator

Illustrated essay on Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, by Maoliosa Boyce, Curator

Biographies and Exhibited Works Exhibited

Credits

Note at the front of the catalogue: “The Turner Prize will be awarded in Derry-Londonderry on 2 December 2013, during a live broadcast on Channel 4, to an artist under fifty, born, living or working in Britain, for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation in the twelve months before 16 April 2013.

Related people

»  Laure Prouvost

Born, 1978 in Croix-Lille, France

»  Tino Sehgal

Born, 1976 in London

»  David Shrigley

Born, 1968 in Macclesfield

»  Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Born, 1977 in London

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom

Turner Prize 1993

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 1993
Published by: Tate
Year published: 1993
Number of pages: 12
Unpaginated.

image of Turner Prize 1993

Catalogue (soft cover catalogue/monochrome text on white gloss paper with full colour illustrations/unpaginated) for the Turner Prize exhibition of 1993, held at Tate Gallery, 3 - 28 November 1993. Along with Hannah Collins, Vong Phaophanit, and Sean Scully, Rachel Whiteread was shortlisted for the Turner Prize 1993. The jury consisted of Iwona Blazwick, Curator of exhibitions in Britain and abroad, Carole Conrad, Art historian and representative of the Patrons of New Art, Declan McGonagle, Director of the Irish Museum of Modrn Art, Dublin, David Sylvester, Art historian, and Nicholas Serota, Director of the Tate Gallery and Chairman of the Turner Prize Jury.  The award was, in due course, made to Whiteread.

Whiteread, the eventual winner was shortlisted for “the continuing development of her work as shown at her retrospective exhibition at the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Sydney Biennale, and Galerie Claire Burrus, Paris.” Collins was shortlisted for “her strong representation at the Third International Isanbul biennale, where she exhibited her series ‘Signs of Life’, and also for her retrospective exhibition at the Centre d’Art Santa Mònica, Barcelona.” Phaophanit was shortlisted for “his installation of ‘Neon Rice Field’ at the Serpentine Gallery, London and at the Venice Biennale Aperto, and also for ‘Litterae Lucentes’ (Light Writing), a compelling installation in the grounds of Killerton Park in Devon.” Scully was shortlisted for “exhibitions of his work at Waddington Galleries, London, Mary Boone Gallery, New York, and for his major retrospective at the Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth, USA.”

All the above quotes come from the introduction to the Turner Prize catalogue, which also contained introductions - both written and visual - to these artists’ work.

Contents as follows:

Portraits and brief introductions to the shortlisted artists anf jurists. The page includes the following text: “The Turner Prize will be awarded at Tate Gallery on 23 November 1993, during a live broadcast on Channel 4, to a British artist under fifty for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the twelve months preceding 30 June 1993.

Sponsor’s Foreword, Waldemar Janusczak, Commissioning Editor for Arts, Channel 4 Television.

Foreword, by Nicholas Serota, Director, Tate Gallery

Illustrated essay on Hannah Collins

Illustrated essay on Vong Phaophanit

Illustrated essay on Sean Scully

Illustrated essay on Rachel Whiteread

(all essays written by Simon Wilson)

Works Exhibited

Previous Winners of the Turner Prize/Credits

The Turner Prize 1993 was sponsored by Channel 4

Related people

»  Vong Phaophanit

Born, 1961 in Laos

»  Sean Scully

Born, 1945 in Dublin, Ireland

»  Rachel Whiteread CBE

Born, 1963 in London, England

Related venues

»  Tate Britain

London, United Kingdom