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Jonathan Watkins

Jonathan Watkins was one of the jurists for The Turner Prize exhibition of 2001, held at Tate Britain, 7 November 2001 - 20 January 2002. Along with Richard Billingham, Martin Creed, and Isaac Julien, Mike Nelson was shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2001. The jury consisted of Nicholas Serota, Director, Tate, and Chairman of the Jury, Patricia Bickers, Editor, Art Monthly, Stuart Evans, Patron of New Art, Tate, Robert Storr, Senior Curator Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Jonathan Watkins, Director, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.  The award was, in due course, made to Creed.

Creed, the eventual winner, was shortlisted for “his solo exhibition Martin Creed Works at Southampton City Art Gallery, Leeds City Art Gallery, Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool, and Camden Arts Centre, London, and Art Now: Martin Creed at Tate Britain, London, in which he reaffirmed the rigour and purity of his work and its characteristic mixture of seriousness and humour.” Julien was shortlisted for “his complex poetic film installations, that combine a theoretical sophistication with visual beauty and sensuality, seen in exhibitions of his work at Cornerhouse, Manchester, the South London Gallery and Victoria Miro Gallery, London in collaboration with Film and Video Umbrella, and in The Film Art of Isaac Julien at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York (and tour).”

All the above quotes come from the introduction to the Turner Prize catalogue, which also contained introductions - both written and visual - to these artists’ work.

The exhibition was sponsored by Channel 4.

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click to show details of Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back - letter from Ikon Gallery

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click to show details of Turner Prize 2001: An exhibition of work by the shortlisted artists

»  Turner Prize 2001: An exhibition of work by the shortlisted artists

Catalogue relating to an exhibition, 2001

Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back

Solo show at Ikon Gallery. 2014
Date: 25 September, 2014 until 10 November, 2014
Curator: Jonathan Watkins
Organiser: Ikon Gallery

Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back was the most comprehensive exhibition to date of paintings by Birmingham-born artist Hurvin Anderson, who was born in 1965. evoking sensations of being caught between one place and another, drawn from personal experience. It surveys the artist’s career, including work made while at the Royal College of Art, London, in 1998, through the acclaimed Peter’s series, inspired by his upbringing in Birmingham’s Afro-Caribbean community, and ongoing works arising out of time spent in Trinidad in 2002. Filling Ikon’s entire exhibition space, reporting back traces the development of Anderson’s distinct figurative style.

Anderson arrived on the international art scene with Peter’s, an ongoing series of paintings depicting the interiors of barbers’ shops, in particular one (owned by Peter Brown) visited by Anderson with his father as a boy. A converted attic serving as an improvised salon for conversation as well as for cutting hair, this was a social retreat vital for many male members of the local Caribbean community; a place he equates to an English garden shed. By painting this subject, the artist was exploring a formative psychological moment, and by returning to it pictorially he takes us with him on a journey that is as sentimental as it is a faithful representation.

It is significant that Anderson depicts sites of leisure, where the mind is usually free to wander. He talks often of being in one place ‘but actually thinking about another’, a fact of his life arising out of his cultural background. He grew up in the English Midlands preoccupied with visions of a warmer, more colourful ‘other country’ and from this experience has developed a way of seeing which he describes as ‘slightly outside of things’. Later paintings of the Caribbean embody this kind of perception with verdant green colour glimpsed behind close-up details of the fences and security grilles found in residential areas, or an expanse of water or desolate approach separating us, the viewer, from the point of interest in the centre ground.

Anderson’s method of composition signifies at once a kind of social and political segregation, a smartness with respect to the business of picture making, amounting to a kind of semi-detached apprehension of what he encounters.

The exhibition came with a substantial, extensively illustrated catalogue, including essays by Jennifer Higgie, writer and co-editor of Frieze, and Eddie Chambers.

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click to show details of Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back - invitation card

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Invite relating to an exhibition, 2013

click to show details of Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back - letter from Ikon Gallery

»  Hurvin Anderson: Reporting Back - letter from Ikon Gallery

Letter relating to an exhibition, 2013

People in this exhibition

»  Hurvin Anderson

Born, 1965 in Birmingham

Exhibition venues

»  Ikon Gallery

Birmingham, United Kingdom